Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Effectiveness of Health Education Given To Prevent Back Pain In Women: Pre- And Post-Test Study

Version 1 : Received: 30 April 2021 / Approved: 7 May 2021 / Online: 7 May 2021 (10:42:50 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 7 May 2021 / Approved: 10 May 2021 / Online: 10 May 2021 (14:07:50 CEST)

How to cite: Babalola, E.O. Effectiveness of Health Education Given To Prevent Back Pain In Women: Pre- And Post-Test Study. Preprints 2021, 2021050141 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0141.v1). Babalola, E.O. Effectiveness of Health Education Given To Prevent Back Pain In Women: Pre- And Post-Test Study. Preprints 2021, 2021050141 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0141.v1).

Abstract

Back pain is a common symptom that affects all age groups across the globe, when left untreated may eventually lead to disability. A convenient sample selection method was used in this study due to the global Covid-19 pandemic lockdown which was effective in Turkey during the investigation period. Thus, virtual data collection and health education including some health risks were employed. A total population of two hundred adult women was involved in the study but one hundred and twenty-one responses were collected. Findings show that, for socio-demographic characteristics, the pain was found highest in women between the ages of 41-50 and obese/overweight individuals. Although, there was no significant difference recorded in the marital status category. Moreover, statistical mean differences were detected between the scales for ODI (4.18) and BPFS (6.09). Also, p<0.05, paired sample t-test was 0.001 ODI and 0.001 BPFS after the training exercise. This suggests that exercise training is inversely correlated with pain severity which implies that training has a significant influence on pain intensity. Thus, it could be concluded that there is a relationship between the training exercise and ODI/BPFS.

Keywords

low back pain; women; exercise; physical activity; health education; Oswestry Disability Index; Back Pain Functional Scale; ergonomics

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