Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Salivarian Trypanosomosis Have Adopted Intricate Host-Pathogen Interaction Mechanisms That Ensures Survival Plain Sight of the Adaptive Immune System

Version 1 : Received: 29 April 2021 / Approved: 6 May 2021 / Online: 6 May 2021 (12:53:49 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Magez, S.; Pinto Torres, J.E.; Oh, S.; Radwanska, M. Salivarian Trypanosomes Have Adopted Intricate Host-Pathogen Interaction Mechanisms that Ensure Survival in Plain Sight of the Adaptive Immune System. Pathogens 2021, 10, 679. Magez, S.; Pinto Torres, J.E.; Oh, S.; Radwanska, M. Salivarian Trypanosomes Have Adopted Intricate Host-Pathogen Interaction Mechanisms that Ensure Survival in Plain Sight of the Adaptive Immune System. Pathogens 2021, 10, 679.

Journal reference: Pathogens 2021, 10, 679
DOI: 10.3390/pathogens10060679

Abstract

Salivarian trypanosomes are extracellular parasites affecting humans, livestock and game animals. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense are human infective sub-species of T. brucei causing Human African Trypanosomosis (HAT - sleeping sickness). The related T. b. brucei parasite lacks the resistance to survive in human serum, and only inflicts animal infections. Animal Trypanosomosis (AT) is not restricted to Africa, but is present on all continents. T. congolense and T. vivax are the most widespread pathogenic trypanosomes in sub-Sahara Africa. Trough mechanical transmission, T. vivax has however been introduced into South America. T. evansi is a unique animal trypanosome that is found in vast territories around the world and can cause atypical Human Trypanosomosis (aHT). All salivarian trypanosomes are well adapted to survival inside the host’s immune system. This is not a hostile environment for these parasite, but this is the place where they thrive. Here we provide an overview of the latest insights into the host-parasite interaction and the unique survival strategies allowing trypanosomes to outsmart the immune system. In addition, we review new developments in treatment and diagnosis as well the issues that have hampered the development of field-applicable anti-trypanosome vaccines for the implementation of sustainable disease control.

Subject Areas

Trypanosomosis, adaptive immunity, parasitemia control, infection

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.