Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Causes and Risk Factor of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Adult Asylum Seekers and Refugees

Version 1 : Received: 20 April 2021 / Approved: 26 April 2021 / Online: 26 April 2021 (20:51:27 CEST)

How to cite: AlRefaie, A. Causes and Risk Factor of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Adult Asylum Seekers and Refugees. Preprints 2021, 2021040694 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0694.v1). AlRefaie, A. Causes and Risk Factor of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Adult Asylum Seekers and Refugees. Preprints 2021, 2021040694 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0694.v1).

Abstract

Abstract Objectives To assess the causes and risk factors of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adult asylum seekers and refugees. To explore whether the causes and risk factors of PTSD, between male and female adult refugees/ asylum seekers is different. Study design Systematic review of current literature. Data Sources PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar up until February 2019 Method A structured systematic search was conducted in the relevant databases. Papers were excluded, if they failed to meet the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Afterwards, a qualitative assessment was performed on the selected papers. Results 12 Studies were included for the final analysis. All papers were either case studies/report or cross sectional studies. The number of traumatic events experienced by refugees/asylum seekers, is the most frequently reported pre-migration causes for PTSD development. Whilst acculturative stress, is the most common post migration stressor. There were mixed reports, regarding the causes of PTSD between both genders of refugees/asylum seekers. Conclusion This reviews’ findings, have potential clinical application into helping clinicians, to risk stratify refugees/asylum seekers for PTSD development and thus aid in embarking on earlier intervention measures. However, more rigorous research similar to this one, is needed for it to be implemented into clinical practice.

Subject Areas

Causes, post traumatic stress disorder,refugees

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