Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Molecular Characteristics of Carnivore Protoparvovirus 1 With High Sequence Similarity Between Wild and Domestic Carnivores in Taiwan

Version 1 : Received: 20 April 2021 / Approved: 22 April 2021 / Online: 22 April 2021 (09:29:43 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Chang, A.-M.; Chen, C.-C. Molecular Characteristics of Carnivore protoparvovirus 1 with High Sequence Similarity between Wild and Domestic Carnivores in Taiwan. Pathogens 2021, 10, 671. Chang, A.-M.; Chen, C.-C. Molecular Characteristics of Carnivore protoparvovirus 1 with High Sequence Similarity between Wild and Domestic Carnivores in Taiwan. Pathogens 2021, 10, 671.

Journal reference: Pathogens 2021, 10, 671
DOI: 10.3390/pathogens10060671

Abstract

Carnivore protoparvovirus 1 (CPPV-1) is a DNA virus causing gastrointestinal disease and immunosuppression in various terrestrial carnivores. Domestic dogs and cats are considered the primary CPPV-1 reservoirs. The habitat overlaps of wild carnivores and free-roaming dogs increases the threat of CPPV-1 transmission between them. This study explored the CPPV-1 distribution among wild carnivores through PCR screening and compared the DNA sequences of the partial capsid protein (VP2) between wild and domestic carnivores. In total, 181 samples were screened for the CPPV-1 VP2 gene, including 32 masked palm civets (Paguma larvata), 63 Chinese ferret badgers (Melogale moschata), and 86 crab-eating mongooses (Herpestes urva), from 2015 to 2019 in Taiwan. The average prevalence of CPPV-1 was 17.7% (32/181), with the highest prevalence in masked palm civets (37.5%). In addition, a masked palm civet was coinfected with two CPPV-1 strains. Among the 33 partial VP2 gene sequences, 23 were identical to sequences amplified from domestic dogs and cats in Asia and the remaining 10 were identified for the first time. This study demonstrated that CPPV-1 has circulated between domestic and wild carnivores in rural Taiwan. Therefore, further population control and health management of free-roaming domestic carnivores are recommended.

Keywords

Carnivore protoparvovirus 1; wild carnivores; domestic carnivore; virus transmission; Taiwan

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