Working Paper Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Classification of Commercial Structures: A Cross Sectional Analysis in Lisbon, 1995-2010

Version 1 : Received: 20 April 2021 / Approved: 21 April 2021 / Online: 21 April 2021 (16:46:59 CEST)

How to cite: Colaço, R.; de Abreu e Silva, J. Classification of Commercial Structures: A Cross Sectional Analysis in Lisbon, 1995-2010. Preprints 2021, 2021040587 Colaço, R.; de Abreu e Silva, J. Classification of Commercial Structures: A Cross Sectional Analysis in Lisbon, 1995-2010. Preprints 2021, 2021040587

Abstract

Commercial classification is essential to spatially describe commerce. Although most of the proposed classifications have been classic functional analyses, rooted on qualitative studies, some recent classifications efforts are found to rely heavily on more quantitative methods, due eventually to increasing data availability and technological advancements. In this paper, a classification is proposed, using k-means clustering and a minimal set of variables (density, diversity and clustering) to derive the commercial structure of Lisbon. The classification is implemented for 1995, 2002 and 2010, using a 150m-sided square grid. The cross-sectional analysis of the results shows the rise of shopping-malls against city centre decline and gentrification, along with changes in cluster composition considering 9 different commercial categories (6 categories of retail, and restaurants, cafes and bars). These findings are in line with literature, thus supporting the obtained classification. Since the classification can be used to accurately describe the commercial structure of the city in different time periods, it is implied that it may also be generalized to different cities. Furthermore, the potential use of cluster membership in retail location models, which is an advantage of the proposed classification, could help strengthen the relationship between location modelling and commercial classification, thus reinforcing the role of commercial studies in urban planning and policymaking.

Subject Areas

commercial studies; commercial classification; retail location model; cluster analysis.

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