Working Paper Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Wheat Speciation and Adaptation: Perspectives from Reticulate Evolution

Version 1 : Received: 20 April 2021 / Approved: 21 April 2021 / Online: 21 April 2021 (08:55:42 CEST)

How to cite: Zhao, X.; Fu, X.; Yin, C.; Lu, F. Wheat Speciation and Adaptation: Perspectives from Reticulate Evolution. Preprints 2021, 2021040559 Zhao, X.; Fu, X.; Yin, C.; Lu, F. Wheat Speciation and Adaptation: Perspectives from Reticulate Evolution. Preprints 2021, 2021040559

Abstract

Reticulate evolution through the interchanging of genetic components across organisms can impact significantly on the fitness and adaptation of species. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum subsp. aestivum) is one of the most important crops in the world. Allopolyploid speciation, frequent hybridization, extensive introgression, and occasional horizontal gene transfer (HGT) have been shaping a typical paradigm of reticulate evolution in bread wheat and its wild relatives, which is likely to have a substantial influence on phenotypic traits and environmental adaptability of bread wheat. In this review, we outlined the evolutionary history of bread wheat and its wild relatives with a highlight on the interspecific hybridization events, demonstrating the reticulate relationship between species/subspecies in the genera Triticum and Aegilops. Furthermore, we discussed the genetic mechanisms and evolutionary significance underlying the introgression of bread wheat and its wild relatives. An in-depth understanding of the evolutionary process of Triticum species should be beneficial to future genetic study and breeding of bread wheat.

Subject Areas

wheat; reticulate evolution; introgression; speciation; hybridization; adaptation; breeding

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