Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

HBV Pre-S1-Derived Myristoylated Peptide (Myr47): Identification of the Inhibitory Activity on the Cellular Uptake of Lipid Nanoparticles

Version 1 : Received: 16 April 2021 / Approved: 19 April 2021 / Online: 19 April 2021 (17:08:53 CEST)

How to cite: Nanahara, M.; Chang, Y.; Somiya, M.; Kuroda, S. HBV Pre-S1-Derived Myristoylated Peptide (Myr47): Identification of the Inhibitory Activity on the Cellular Uptake of Lipid Nanoparticles. Preprints 2021, 2021040512 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0512.v1). Nanahara, M.; Chang, Y.; Somiya, M.; Kuroda, S. HBV Pre-S1-Derived Myristoylated Peptide (Myr47): Identification of the Inhibitory Activity on the Cellular Uptake of Lipid Nanoparticles. Preprints 2021, 2021040512 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0512.v1).

Abstract

Myr47 lipopeptide consisting of hepatitis B virus (HBV) pre-S1 domain (myristoylated 2-48 peptide) is a commercialized effective anti-HBV drug, preventing the interaction of HBV with sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) on human hepatocytes, of which the activity requires both N-myristoylation residue and specific amino acid sequence. Meanwhile, we recently reported that Myr47 reduces the cellular uptake of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg, subviral particle of HBV) in the absence of NTCP expression (Somiya; et al. Virology 2016, 497, 23–32). In this study, we analyzed how Myr47 reduces the cellular uptake of lipid nanoparticles (including liposomes (LPs) and HBsAg) without NTCP expression. By using Myr47 mutants lacking the HBV infection inhibitory activity, they could reduce the cellular uptake of LPs in an N-myristoylation-dependent manner whereas in an amino acid sequence-independent manner. Moreover, Myr47 and its mutants could reduce the interaction of LPs with apolipoprotein E3 (ApoE3) in an N-myristoylation-dependent manner regardless of their amino acid sequences. From these results, N-myristoyl residue of lipopeptides generally could interfere the LPs/HBsAg-ApoE3 complex formation, thereby reducing the cellular uptake of LPs/HBsAg. When lipid nanoparticles are used as a DDS (drug delivery system) nanocarrier, the surface modification with lipopeptides may be a new method to inhibit unwanted cellular uptake of DDS nanocarriers by non-target cells.

Subject Areas

hepatitis B virus (HBV); Myr47 lipopeptide; cellular uptake; liposomes; sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP); HBV surface antigen (HBsAg); apolipoprotein E (ApoE)

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