Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Sequence Length of HIV-1 Subtype B Increases Over Time: Analyzing a Cohort of Patients with Hemophilia Over 30 Years

Version 1 : Received: 24 February 2021 / Approved: 25 February 2021 / Online: 25 February 2021 (10:31:36 CET)

How to cite: Cho, Y.; Kim, J.; Foley, B. Sequence Length of HIV-1 Subtype B Increases Over Time: Analyzing a Cohort of Patients with Hemophilia Over 30 Years. Preprints 2021, 2021020575 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202102.0575.v1). Cho, Y.; Kim, J.; Foley, B. Sequence Length of HIV-1 Subtype B Increases Over Time: Analyzing a Cohort of Patients with Hemophilia Over 30 Years. Preprints 2021, 2021020575 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202102.0575.v1).

Abstract

The objective of this study is to investigate whether the sequence length of HIV-1 increases over time. A longitudinal analysis of full-length coding region sequences (FLs) in an outbreak of HIV-1 infection among patients with hemophilia and local controls identified as infected with the Korean subclade B of HIV-1 (KSB). Genes amplified by overlapping RT-PCR or nested PCR were subjected to direct sequencing. In total, 141 FLs were sequentially determined over 30 years in 62 KSB-infected patients. Non-KSB sequences were retrieved from the Los Alamos National Laboratory HIV Database. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that within KSB, 2 FLs from plasma donors O and P comprised two clusters together with 8 and 12 patients with hemophilia, respectively. Signature pattern analysis for the KSB of HIV-1 revealed signature nucleotide residues at 1.05%, compared with local controls. Additionally, in-depth FLs sequence analysis over 30 years in KSB indicates that the KSB FL significantly increases over time before combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) and decreases on cART. Furthermore, the increase in FLs over time significantly occurred in the subtypes B, C and G, but, there was no increase in the subtypes D, A, and F1. Consequently, subtypes F1 and D had the shortest sequence length. Our analysis was extended to compare HIV-1 with HIV-2 and SIVs. Essentially, the longer the sequence length (SIVsm > HIV-2 > SIVcpz > HIV-1), the longer the survival period. The increase in the length of the HIV-1 sequence over time suggests that it might be an evolutionary direction toward attenuated pathogenicity.

Subject Areas

full-length coding region sequence; HIV-1; Korean subclade B; sequence length; hemophilia; evolution

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