Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Developing Salinity Tolerate Trees for Challenging Sites and Urban Forests Based on the Inferences of Physiological Responses: Using Ulmus Pumila as an Example

Version 1 : Received: 14 February 2021 / Approved: 17 February 2021 / Online: 17 February 2021 (09:22:23 CET)

How to cite: Mu, D.; Ding, C. Developing Salinity Tolerate Trees for Challenging Sites and Urban Forests Based on the Inferences of Physiological Responses: Using Ulmus Pumila as an Example. Preprints 2021, 2021020347 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202102.0347.v1). Mu, D.; Ding, C. Developing Salinity Tolerate Trees for Challenging Sites and Urban Forests Based on the Inferences of Physiological Responses: Using Ulmus Pumila as an Example. Preprints 2021, 2021020347 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202102.0347.v1).

Abstract

Elevated salinity is one of the major environmental limitation factors of plant growth and development and salinity stress compromises the production and survival of plantation and urban forests and agricultural crops in the arid, semi-arid, and intertidal zones. Ulmus pumila, a salt- indigenous tree species in Asia and is widely deployed in salt-affected areas in China, and U.pumila is promising for multi-varietal forestry in plantation and urban forests. The comprehensive mechanism of the intraspecific salt tolerance is still not clear yet. Here, we investigated the physiological responses of the salinity stress based on the antioxidant enzyme activities, osmotic adjustments, and gas exchange among salt-tolerant U. pumila genotypes for 100 days under five different NaCl levels (0%, 0.3%, 0.5%, 0.7%, and 0.9% w/v) with natural surroundings and rain shade at age-2. Salt stress decreased height (HR), ground diameter (DR), and dry weight (biomass) were significantly different among genotypes. HR and performance indices were positively correlated with photosynthesis rate (Pn), apparent mesophyll conductance (AMC), and chlorophyll (CHLL) with (r= 0.7 - 0.8 ***), but were negatively related to the free proline, sugar, and protein accumulation (r=-0.5 ~ -0.7***). We found that high accumulation of sugars and more activities of SOD enzyme in leaf tissue contribute to the osmotic adjustment and ROS scavenging system under salinity treatment; the sugar content and SOD activity play key roles in U. pumila’s tolerance to salt stress, and are promising indicators for U. pumila species ex vitro selections. The ex vitro selection results align with the previous in vitro studies [37] and is promising for the MVF development.

Subject Areas

Ulmus pumila; salt stress; salt-tolerance; antioxidants; osmolytes; gas-exchange

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