Working Paper Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Long-Term Impact of Heavy Pruning on the Growth of Small-Leaved Lime (Tilia cordata Mill.) and Road Users Safety

Version 1 : Received: 2 February 2021 / Approved: 3 February 2021 / Online: 3 February 2021 (10:12:44 CET)

How to cite: Suchocka, M.; Swoczyna, T.; Kosno-Jończy, J.; Kalaji, H.M. Long-Term Impact of Heavy Pruning on the Growth of Small-Leaved Lime (Tilia cordata Mill.) and Road Users Safety. Preprints 2021, 2021020109 Suchocka, M.; Swoczyna, T.; Kosno-Jończy, J.; Kalaji, H.M. Long-Term Impact of Heavy Pruning on the Growth of Small-Leaved Lime (Tilia cordata Mill.) and Road Users Safety. Preprints 2021, 2021020109

Abstract

Tree pruning is applied to reduce conflict with infrastructure, buildings, and any other human activity. However, heavy pruning may result in diminished tree crown capacity for sugar production and exposure to fungi infection risk that lead to decrease of tree stability or vigour. In this paper, we analyse the effect of heavy pruning of landscape road-side trees on their photosynthetic performance reflected in the photosystem II function relative to neighbouring unpruned trees. Four-year circumference increments and tree crown growth were studied by terrestrial imaging. Tree vitality (Roloff’s classification) and risk (Visual Tree Assessment) were evaluated. Over-pruned trees showed intensified photosynthetic efficiency in the growing season following pruning. After four years, pruned trees rebuilt their crowns, however not all of them. Results obtained from biometric, vitality, and risk assessment showed high differentiation in pruned tree crown recovery. Our results reveal that despite the intensified physiological efforts of trees to recover from wounding effects, severe pruning evokes the dieback occurrence and higher risk of failure in mature trees.

Subject Areas

risk assessment; chlorophyll-a fluorescence; JIP-test; resource limitation; tree protection; urban trees, wounding,; VTA

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