Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Molecular Epidemiology Surveillance of SARS-Cov-2: Mutations and Genetic Diversity One Year After Emerging

Version 1 : Received: 8 January 2021 / Approved: 11 January 2021 / Online: 11 January 2021 (09:50:55 CET)

How to cite: Flores-Alanis, A.; Cruz-Rangel, A.; Rodríguez-Gómez, F.; González, J.; Torres-Guerrero, C.A.; Delgado, G.; Cravioto, A.; Morales-Espinosa, R. Molecular Epidemiology Surveillance of SARS-Cov-2: Mutations and Genetic Diversity One Year After Emerging. Preprints 2021, 2021010173 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0173.v1). Flores-Alanis, A.; Cruz-Rangel, A.; Rodríguez-Gómez, F.; González, J.; Torres-Guerrero, C.A.; Delgado, G.; Cravioto, A.; Morales-Espinosa, R. Molecular Epidemiology Surveillance of SARS-Cov-2: Mutations and Genetic Diversity One Year After Emerging. Preprints 2021, 2021010173 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0173.v1).

Abstract

In December 2019, the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in the province of Wuhan, China. Since then, it has spread worldwide with new mutations being reported. We performed genomic analysis to identify the changes in genetic diversity of SARS-CoV-2 between December 2019 and November 2020, and through molecular surveillance, we monitored the mutations that could be involved in viral fitness. We analyzed 2,213 complete genomes from 6 geographical regions worldwide, which were downloaded from GenBank and GISAID databases. Although SARS-CoV-2 presented low genetic diversity, there has been an increase over time, with the presence of several hotspot mutations throughout its genome. We identified 7 frequent mutations that resulted in non-synonymous substitutions (dN). Two of them, C14408T>P323L and A23403G>D614G, located in the nsp12 and Spike protein, respectively, emerged early in the pandemic and showed a considerable increase in frequency over time. Two other mutations, A1163T>I120F in nsp2 and G22992A>S477N in the Spike protein emerged recently and have spread in Oceania and Europe. Continuous molecular surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 will be necessary to detect and describe the transmission dynamics of new variants of the virus with clinical relevance. This information is important to improve programs to control the virus.

Subject Areas

SARS-CoV-2; genetic diversity; molecular surveillance; natural selection; non-synonymous substitution

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.