Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Mixture Effects of Heavy Metals on Insulin Resistance in Shipyard Welders

Version 1 : Received: 31 December 2020 / Approved: 4 January 2021 / Online: 4 January 2021 (08:38:23 CET)

How to cite: Su, T.; Chuang, K.; Jeng, H.; Hsu, Y.; Chuang, H.; Lai, C.; Pan, C. Mixture Effects of Heavy Metals on Insulin Resistance in Shipyard Welders. Preprints 2021, 2021010004 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0004.v1). Su, T.; Chuang, K.; Jeng, H.; Hsu, Y.; Chuang, H.; Lai, C.; Pan, C. Mixture Effects of Heavy Metals on Insulin Resistance in Shipyard Welders. Preprints 2021, 2021010004 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0004.v1).

Abstract

Certain studies have reported various insulin resistance responses to ambient heavy metal pollution, but few have reported such responses to occupational heavy metal pollution. Even fewer have demonstrated a relationship between mixture effects of heavy metals and insulin resistance in welding workers. Overall, we recruited 53 welders and 48 administrative staff from a shipyard located in northern Taiwan. Personal exposure to heavy metals was monitored for PM2.5 and urine. Blood samples from each participant were collected from the antecubital vein after fasting. Urine samples from each participant were collected in the same period as blood samples. The geometric mean levels for chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and cadmium (Cd) in the PM2.5 of the personal breathing zone and urinary Mn of welders were significantly higher than those in administrative staffs. Ambient Cr, Co, Ni, and Cu levels in the PM2.5 and urinary Cd were positively related to HOMA2-IR after adjusting for personal covariates (PM2.5-Cr: β=0.036, 95%C.I.: 0.002 to 0.070; PM2.5-Co: β=0.040, 95%C.I.: 0.002 to 0.077; PM2.5-Ni: β=0.054, 95%C.I.: 0.013 to 0.094; PM2.5-Cu: β=0.049, 95%C.I.: 0.010 to 0.088; U-Cd: β=0.209, 95%C.I.: 0.052 to 0.366, respectively). Our findings indicated the PM2.5 metal components and urinary metals were associated with increased insulin resistance in shipyard welders.

Subject Areas

shipyard welders; PM2.5 metal components; urinary metals; insulin resistance

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