Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Corynebacterium Glutamicum Mechanosensing: From Osmoregulation to L-Glutamate Secretion for the Avian Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis

Version 1 : Received: 31 December 2020 / Approved: 31 December 2020 / Online: 31 December 2020 (13:00:44 CET)

How to cite: Nakayama, Y. Corynebacterium Glutamicum Mechanosensing: From Osmoregulation to L-Glutamate Secretion for the Avian Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis. Preprints 2020, 2020120807 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0807.v1). Nakayama, Y. Corynebacterium Glutamicum Mechanosensing: From Osmoregulation to L-Glutamate Secretion for the Avian Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis. Preprints 2020, 2020120807 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0807.v1).

Abstract

After the discovery of Corynebacterium glutamicum from the avian feces contaminated soil, its enigmatic L-glutamate secretion by corynebacterial MscCG-type mechanosensitive channels has been utilized for the industrial monosodium glutamate production. Bacterial mechanosensitive channels are activated directly by increased membrane tension upon hypoosmotic downshock, thus the physiological significance of the corynebacterial L-glutamate secretion has been considered as adjusting turgor pressure by releasing cytoplasmic solutes. In this review, we present information that corynebacterial mechanosensitive channels have been evolutionally specialized as carriers to secrete L-glutamate into the surrounding environment in their habitats rather than osmotic safety valves. The lipid modulation activation of MscCG channels in L-glutamate production can be explained by the “Force-From-Lipids” and “Force-From-Tethers” mechanosensing paradigms and differs significantly from the mechanical activation upon hypoosmotic shock. The review also provides information on the search for possibilities that Corynebacterium glutamicum was originally a gut bacterium in the avian host in the aim of understanding physiological roles of corynebacterial mechanosensing. Corynebacterium glutamicum is able to secrete L-glutamate by mechanosensitive channels in the gut microbiota and help the host brain function via the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

Subject Areas

Mechanosensitive channel; Corynebacterium glutamicum; L-glutamate secretion

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