Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Green Business & Sustainable Development School – A Case Study for an Innovative Educational Concept to Prevent Big Ideas from Failure

Version 1 : Received: 31 December 2020 / Approved: 31 December 2020 / Online: 31 December 2020 (12:44:11 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Hennemann, J.N.; Draser, B.; Stofkova, K.R. The Green Business and Sustainable Development School—A Case Study for an Innovative Educational Concept to Prevent Big Ideas from Failure. Sustainability 2021, 13, 1943. Hennemann, J.N.; Draser, B.; Stofkova, K.R. The Green Business and Sustainable Development School—A Case Study for an Innovative Educational Concept to Prevent Big Ideas from Failure. Sustainability 2021, 13, 1943.

Journal reference: Sustainability 2021, 13, 1943
DOI: 10.3390/su13041943

Abstract

This article addresses the question why initiatives in the field of green business and sustainable development often fail. Therefore, it dismantles some typical patterns of failure and shows – as a case study – how these patterns can be challenged through an innovative educational concept: the green business and sustainable development school. The applied methodology is a real-life project that is designed through blended, interdisciplinary elements from business model canvas, Theory U, participation and design thinking. The results of the school initiative are discussed and evaluated by four distinctive stakeholder groups and outline the school’s supporting potential to overcome typical patterns of failure by the younger generation in the future. This article concludes with ideas to enhance the school concept reaching out to even more stakeholder-groups to increase its reliability and viability.

Subject Areas

educational concept; green business school; new green deal; interdisciplinary capacity and movement building; green failure; young generation collaboration network; prevent big ideas from failure, theory U, science and action-based research, design thinking

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