Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Consumption of Sweet Beverages and Cancer Risk. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

Version 1 : Received: 30 December 2020 / Approved: 31 December 2020 / Online: 31 December 2020 (12:41:25 CET)

How to cite: Llaha, F.; Gil-Lespinard, M.; Unal, P.; de Villasante, I.; Castañeda, J.; Zamora-Ros, R. Consumption of Sweet Beverages and Cancer Risk. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. Preprints 2020, 2020120801 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0801.v1). Llaha, F.; Gil-Lespinard, M.; Unal, P.; de Villasante, I.; Castañeda, J.; Zamora-Ros, R. Consumption of Sweet Beverages and Cancer Risk. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. Preprints 2020, 2020120801 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0801.v1).

Abstract

The consumption of sweet beverages, including sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), artificially sweetened beverages (ASB) and fruit juices (FJ) is associated with the risk of different cardiometabolic diseases and probably with some tumors as well. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies aimed at evaluating the association between sweet beverage intake and different types of cancer risk. Suitable papers published up to June 2020 were searched through PubMed, Web of Science and SCOPUS databases, using relevant keywords. Overall, 64 studies were identified for the systematic review, of which 27 were selected for the meta-analysis. This was performed by analyzing the multivariable-adjusted OR, RR or HR of the highest compared with the lowest sweet beverage intake categories. Random effects showed significant positive association between SSBs intake and breast (RR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01 – 1.30) and prostate cancer risk (RR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.10 – 1.27), also between FJs and prostate cancer risk (RR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.01 – 1.05). Associations between SSBs and colorectal and pancreatic cancer risk, FJs and breast, colorectal and pancreatic cancer risk, ASBs and pancreatic cancer risk tended to be positive but did not reach the statistically significant threshold. This study supports the recommendation to limit the consumption of SSBs and FJs for cancer prevention and proposes to further investigate the potential harmful role of ASBs intake in cancer risk.

Subject Areas

systematic review; meta-analysis; cohort; case-control; sugar sweetened beverages; artificial sweetened beverages; fruit juice; cancer.

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