Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Impact of Service User Video Presentations on Explicit and Implicit Stigma toward Mental Illness among Medical Students in Nepal: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Version 1 : Received: 29 December 2020 / Approved: 30 December 2020 / Online: 30 December 2020 (14:12:49 CET)

How to cite: Tergesen, C.L.; Gurung, D.; Dhungana, S.; Risal, A.; Basel, P.; Tamrakar, D.; Amatya, A.; Park, L.P.; Kohrt, B.A. Impact of Service User Video Presentations on Explicit and Implicit Stigma toward Mental Illness among Medical Students in Nepal: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Preprints 2020, 2020120754 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0754.v1). Tergesen, C.L.; Gurung, D.; Dhungana, S.; Risal, A.; Basel, P.; Tamrakar, D.; Amatya, A.; Park, L.P.; Kohrt, B.A. Impact of Service User Video Presentations on Explicit and Implicit Stigma toward Mental Illness among Medical Students in Nepal: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Preprints 2020, 2020120754 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0754.v1).

Abstract

This study evaluated the impact of didactic videos and service user testimonial videos on mental illness stigma among medical students. Two randomized controlled trials were conducted in Nepal. Study 1 examined stigma reduction for depression. Study 2 examined depression and psychosis. Participants were Nepali medical students (Study 1:n=94, Study 2:¬n=213) randomized to three conditions: a didactic video based on the mental health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP), a service user video about living with mental illness, or a control condition with no videos. In Study 1, videos only addressed depression. In Study 2, videos addressed depression and psychosis. In Study 1, both didactic and service user videos reduced stigma compared to the control (F2,91=6.37, p=0.003). In Study 2 (depression and psychosis), there were no differences among the three arms (F2,210=2.07, p=0.13). When comparing Study 1 and 2, there was greater stigma reduction in the service user video arm with only depression versus service user videos with depression and psychosis (t(31)=-3.04, p=0.005). In summary, didactic and service user videos were associated with decreased stigma when content addressed only depression. However, no stigma reduction was seen when including depression and psychosis. This calls for different strategies based on types of mental illnesses. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT03231761

Subject Areas

attitudes; depression; developing countries; medical education; mental health; psychosis; service users; stigma

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