Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Performance and Emissions of a Microturbine and Turbofan Powered by Alternative Fuels

Version 1 : Received: 15 December 2020 / Approved: 16 December 2020 / Online: 16 December 2020 (09:56:50 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Przysowa, R.; Gawron, B.; Białecki, T.; Łęgowik, A.; Merkisz, J.; Jasiński, R. Performance and Emissions of a Microturbine and Turbofan Powered by Alternative Fuels. Aerospace 2021, 8, 25. Przysowa, R.; Gawron, B.; Białecki, T.; Łęgowik, A.; Merkisz, J.; Jasiński, R. Performance and Emissions of a Microturbine and Turbofan Powered by Alternative Fuels. Aerospace 2021, 8, 25.

Journal reference: Aerospace 2021, 8, 25
DOI: 10.3390/aerospace8020025

Abstract

Alternative fuels containing biocomponents produced in various technologies are introduced in aviation to reduce its carbon footprint but there is little data describing their impact on the performance and emissions of engines. The purpose of the work is to compare the performance and gas emissions produced from two different jet engines: the GTM-140 microturbine and the full-size DGEN380 turbofan, powered by blends of Jet A-1 and one of two biocomponents: 1) ATJ and 2) HEFA produced from used cooking oil (UCO) in various concentrations. The acquired data will be used to develop an engine emissivity model to predict gas emissions. Blends of the mineral fuel with synthetic components were prepared in various concentrations, and their physicochemical parameters were examined in the laboratory. Measurements of emissions from both engines were carried out in selected operating points using the Semtech DS gaseous analyzer and the EEPS spectrometer. The impact of tested blends on engine operating parameters is limited, and their use does not carry the risk of a significant decrease in aircraft performance or increase in fuel consumption. Increasing the content of biocomponents causes a noticeable rise in the emission of CO and slight increase for some other gasses (HC and NOx), which should not, however, worsen the working conditions of the ground personnel. This implies that there are no contraindications against using tested blends for fuelling gas-turbine engines.

Subject Areas

turbofan; microturbine; sustainable aviation fuel; ATJ; HEFA; emissions; alternative fuel; biocomponent; combustion; fuel blend; drop-in fuel; synthesized kerosene

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