Working Paper Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Cross-Shore Profile Evolution After an Extreme Erosion Event, Palanga, Lithuania

Version 1 : Received: 14 December 2020 / Approved: 15 December 2020 / Online: 15 December 2020 (10:22:52 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Kelpšaitė-Rimkienė, L.; Parnell, K.E.; Žaromskis, R.; Kondrat, V. Cross-Shore Profile Evolution after an Extreme Erosion Event—Palanga, Lithuania. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9, 38. Kelpšaitė-Rimkienė, L.; Parnell, K.E.; Žaromskis, R.; Kondrat, V. Cross-Shore Profile Evolution after an Extreme Erosion Event—Palanga, Lithuania. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9, 38.

Journal reference: J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9, 38
DOI: 10.3390/jmse9010038

Abstract

We report cross-shore profile evolution at Palanga, eastern Baltic Sea where short period waves dominate. Cross-shore profile studies began directly after a significant coastal erosion caused by storm “Anatoly” in December of 1999 and continued for a year. Further measurements were undertaken sixteen years later. Cross-shore profile ∆V(x) changes were described, and cross-shore transport rates Q(x) were calculated. A K-means clustering technique was applied to determine sections of the profile with the same development tendencies. Profile evolution was strongly influenced by the depth of closure which is constrained by a moraine layer and the presence of a groyne. The method used divided the profile into four clusters: the 1st cluster in the deepest water represents profile evolution limited by the depth of closure, and the 2nd and 3rd mostly are affected by processes induced by wind, wave and sea-water level changes. The most intensive sediment volume changes were observed directly after the coastal erosion. The largest sand accumulation was in the 4th profile cluster, which includes the upper beach and dunes. Seaward extension of the dune system caused a narrowing of the visible beach which has led to an increased sand volume (accretion) being misinterpreted as erosion

Subject Areas

cross-shore profile; sediment transport rates; semi-enclosed sea; sandy coast; coastal erosion; dune development.

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