Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

From Covid-19 to Psychological Distress: A Systematic Review on Quarantine

Version 1 : Received: 4 December 2020 / Approved: 7 December 2020 / Online: 7 December 2020 (10:32:10 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Cavicchioli, M.; Ferrucci, R.; Guidetti, M.; Canevini, M.P.; Pravettoni, G.; Galli, F. What Will Be the Impact of the Covid-19 Quarantine on Psychological Distress? Considerations Based on a Systematic Review of Pandemic Outbreaks. Healthcare 2021, 9, 101. Cavicchioli, M.; Ferrucci, R.; Guidetti, M.; Canevini, M.P.; Pravettoni, G.; Galli, F. What Will Be the Impact of the Covid-19 Quarantine on Psychological Distress? Considerations Based on a Systematic Review of Pandemic Outbreaks. Healthcare 2021, 9, 101.

Journal reference: Healthcare 2021, 9, 101
DOI: 10.3390/healthcare9010101

Abstract

Background. The novel coronavirus (SARS-COV-2) and related syndrome (COVID-19) has required a worldwide measure of quarantine with severe consequences for millions of people. Methods. Since psychopathological consequences related to social restrictions have been reported, a systematic review according to Cochrane Collaboration guidelines and the PRISMA Statement was performed to quantify the effects of quarantine on mental health of adults. Major databases - Pubmed, Scopus, Embase, PsycInfo, and Web of Science- were researched for observational studies with data on mental health indexes related to quarantine or isolation for epidemic infections. Results. Twenty-one independent studies were included for 82,312 subjects. Conclusions. The results showed that at least 20% of people exposed to these conditions reported a psychological distress, with a prevalence of PTSD, depression and, less often, generalized anxiety. Important methodological bias weakens the conclusion of most studies, opening to the need of further research on mental health after quarantine and related risk/buffering factors.

Keywords

Covid-19; psychological distress; anxiety; depression; PTSD

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