Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

A Review of Registered Randomized Controlled Trials for the Prevention of Obesity in Infancy

Version 1 : Received: 25 November 2020 / Approved: 26 November 2020 / Online: 26 November 2020 (11:06:09 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 8 January 2021 / Approved: 8 January 2021 / Online: 8 January 2021 (14:35:46 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Mihrshahi, S.; Jawad, D.; Richards, L.; Hunter, K.E.; Ekambareshwar, M.; Seidler, A.L.; Baur, L.A. A Review of Registered Randomized Controlled Trials for the Prevention of Obesity in Infancy. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2444. Mihrshahi, S.; Jawad, D.; Richards, L.; Hunter, K.E.; Ekambareshwar, M.; Seidler, A.L.; Baur, L.A. A Review of Registered Randomized Controlled Trials for the Prevention of Obesity in Infancy. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2444.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2444
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph18052444

Abstract

Childhood overweight and obesity is a worldwide public health issue. Our objective was to describe planned, ongoing and completed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) designed for the prevention of obesity in early childhood. Two databases (World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, ClinicalTrials.gov) were searched to identify RCTs with the primary aim of preventing childhood obesity and at least one outcome related to child weight. Interventions needed to start in the first two years of childhood or earlier, continue for at least 6 months postnatally, include a component related to lifestyle or behaviors, and have a follow up time of at least 2 years. We identified 29 unique RCTs, implemented since 2008, with most being undertaken in high income countries. Interventions ranged from advice on diet, activity, sleep, emotion regulation and parenting education through individual home visits, clinic-based consultations or group education sessions. Eleven trials have published data on child weight related outcomes to date, though most were not sufficiently powered to detect significant effects. Many trials detected improvements in practices such as breastfeeding, screen time and physical activity in the intervention groups compared to the control groups. Further follow-up of ongoing trials is needed to assess longer-term effects.

Keywords

Behaviours; Childhood; Infant feeding; Interventions; Obesity; Prevention; Physical activity.

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