Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Effects of Caffeinated Beverage Consumption on the Sleep Habits and Lifestyle of Medical Students in Public and Private Medical Universities in Karachi, Pakistan

Version 1 : Received: 21 November 2020 / Approved: 23 November 2020 / Online: 23 November 2020 (20:15:40 CET)
(This article belongs to the Research Topic Quantum Computing)

How to cite: Afroz, M.N.; Asghar, A.; Kamal, S.; Ishfaque, S.; Chandar bhan, S.; kamal, A.; tariq, H. The Effects of Caffeinated Beverage Consumption on the Sleep Habits and Lifestyle of Medical Students in Public and Private Medical Universities in Karachi, Pakistan. Preprints 2020, 2020110598 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0598.v1). Afroz, M.N.; Asghar, A.; Kamal, S.; Ishfaque, S.; Chandar bhan, S.; kamal, A.; tariq, H. The Effects of Caffeinated Beverage Consumption on the Sleep Habits and Lifestyle of Medical Students in Public and Private Medical Universities in Karachi, Pakistan. Preprints 2020, 2020110598 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0598.v1).

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the effects of caffeine consumption on the sleep habits and lifestyle of medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at Jinnah Sindh Medical University (JSMU) and Hamdard College of Medicine. On 422 undergraduate students aged 18-25 years, through random sampling. The duration of the study was from January 2019 to June 2019. The data was collected through self-administered questionnaire which included data regarding sleep habits and lifestyle of medical students. Results: Majority (81.6%) of the students consumed caffeine while only (18.4%) did not. One third of the participants (31.8%) reported caffeine consumption increased their academic performance and (57.3%) reported that it does not. More than half of the participants (63.3%) who consumed caffeine slept during class, whereas (47.2%) never had difficulty in falling asleep during the night. Conclusion: This research concluded that caffeine does have some role on sleep habits of medical students as they tend to have less sleep hours, experience day time dysfunction, average quality of sleep, and falling asleep during class. It has been concluded that caffeine has no effect on eating habits of medical students however, it does increase the screening time, keeping them active.

Subject Areas

caffeine; sleep habits; lifestyle; medical students; universities

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