Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Sensing the Past: Perspectives on Remote Sensing and Collaborative Archaeology from Coastal California

Version 1 : Received: 10 November 2020 / Approved: 12 November 2020 / Online: 12 November 2020 (09:43:15 CET)

How to cite: Sanchez, G.; Grone, M.; Apodaca, A.; Byram, S.; Lopez, V.; Jewett, R. Sensing the Past: Perspectives on Remote Sensing and Collaborative Archaeology from Coastal California. Preprints 2020, 2020110335 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0335.v1). Sanchez, G.; Grone, M.; Apodaca, A.; Byram, S.; Lopez, V.; Jewett, R. Sensing the Past: Perspectives on Remote Sensing and Collaborative Archaeology from Coastal California. Preprints 2020, 2020110335 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0335.v1).

Abstract

This paper summarizes over a decade of collaborative eco-archaeological research along the central coast of California involving researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, tribal citizens from the Amah Mutsun Tribal Band, and California Department of Parks and Recreation archaeologists. Our research employs remote sensing methods to document and assess cultural resources threatened by coastal erosion and geophysical methods to identify archaeological deposits, minimize impacts on sensitive cultural resources, and provide tribal and state collaborators with a suite of data to consider before proceeding with any form of invasive archaeological excavation. Our case study of recent eco-archaeological research developed to define the historical biogeography of threatened and endangered anadromous salmonids demonstrates how remote sensing technologies help identify dense archaeological deposits, remove barriers, and create bridges through equitable and inclusive research practices between archaeologists and the Amah Mutsun Tribal Band. These experiences have resulted in the incorporation of remote sensing techniques as a central approach of the Amah Mutsun Tribal Band when conducting archaeology in their traditional territories.

Subject Areas

Amah Mutsun Tribal Band; Indigenous archaeology; Collaborative archaeology; Community-based participatory research; California archaeology; Indigenous stewardship

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