Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Strategies for Delivering Mental Health Services in Response to Global Climate Change

Version 1 : Received: 6 October 2020 / Approved: 7 October 2020 / Online: 7 October 2020 (09:22:41 CEST)

How to cite: Palinkas, L.; O’Donnell, M.; Lau, W.; Wong, M. Strategies for Delivering Mental Health Services in Response to Global Climate Change. Preprints 2020, 2020100150 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0150.v1). Palinkas, L.; O’Donnell, M.; Lau, W.; Wong, M. Strategies for Delivering Mental Health Services in Response to Global Climate Change. Preprints 2020, 2020100150 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0150.v1).

Abstract

This review examines from a services perspective strategies for preparedness and response to mental health impacts of three types of climate-related events: 1) acute climate-related events such as hurricanes, floods and wildfires, 2) sub-acute or long-term changes in the environment such as drought and heat stress; and 3) the existential threat of long-lasting changes, including higher temperatures, rising sea levels and a permanently altered and potentially uninhabitable physical environment. Strategies for acute events include development and implementation of guidelines and interventions for monitoring and treating adverse mental health outcomes and strengthening individual and community resilience, training of non-mental health professionals for services delivery, and the mapping of available resources and locations of at-risk populations. Additional strategies for sub-acute changes include advocacy for mitigation policies and programs and adaptation of guidelines and interventions to address the secondary impacts of sub-acute events such as economic loss, threats to livelihood, health and well-being, population and family displacement, environmental degradation and collective violence. Strategies for long-lasting changes include implementation of evidence-based risk communication interventions that address the existential threat of climate change, promoting the mental health benefits of environmental conservation, and promoting positive mental health impacts of climate change.

Subject Areas

mental health services; climate change; disasters; trauma; prevention treatment

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