Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Optimizing Window Design on Residential Building Facades by Considering Heat Transfer and Natural Lighting in Non-tropical Regions of Australia

Version 1 : Received: 4 October 2020 / Approved: 6 October 2020 / Online: 6 October 2020 (09:10:02 CEST)

How to cite: Chen, Z.; Hammad, A.W.A.; Kamardeen, I.; Haddad, A. Optimizing Window Design on Residential Building Facades by Considering Heat Transfer and Natural Lighting in Non-tropical Regions of Australia. Preprints 2020, 2020100111 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0111.v1). Chen, Z.; Hammad, A.W.A.; Kamardeen, I.; Haddad, A. Optimizing Window Design on Residential Building Facades by Considering Heat Transfer and Natural Lighting in Non-tropical Regions of Australia. Preprints 2020, 2020100111 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0111.v1).

Abstract

Windows account for a significant proportion of the total energy lost in buildings. The interaction of window type, Window-to-Wall Ratio (WWR) scheduled and window placement height would influence the natural lighting and heat transfer through windows. This is a pressing issue for non-tropical regions considering their high emissions and distinct climatic characteristics. A limitation exists in the adoption of common simulation-based optimisation approaches in the literature, which are hardly accessible to practitioners. This article develops a numerical-based window design optimisation model using a common Building Information Modelling (BIM) platform adopted throughout the industry, focusing on non-tropical regions of Australia. Three objective functions are proposed; the first objective is to maximize the available daylight, and the other two emphasize on the undesirable heat transfer through windows in summer and winter respectively. The developed model is tested on a case study located in Sydney, Australia, and a set of Pareto-optimum solutions is obtained. Through the use of the proposed model, energy savings of up to 16.43% are achieved. Key findings on the case example indicate that leveraging winter heat gain to reduce annual energy consumption should not be the top priority when designing windows for Sydney.

Subject Areas

multi-objective; optimisation; revit; dynamo; BIM;window design; window type; window position; window-to-wall ratio

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.