Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

In vivo Modelling of Toxicity of Eight Commercial Artificial Sweeteners in Daphnia Neonates and Zebrafish Embryos through Cardiac Performance Assessments

Version 1 : Received: 17 September 2020 / Approved: 18 September 2020 / Online: 18 September 2020 (04:47:33 CEST)

How to cite: Saputra, F.; Lai, Y.; Fernandez, R.A.; Macabeo, A.P.G.; Lai, H.; Huang, J.; Hsiao, C. In vivo Modelling of Toxicity of Eight Commercial Artificial Sweeteners in Daphnia Neonates and Zebrafish Embryos through Cardiac Performance Assessments. Preprints 2020, 2020090419 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0419.v1). Saputra, F.; Lai, Y.; Fernandez, R.A.; Macabeo, A.P.G.; Lai, H.; Huang, J.; Hsiao, C. In vivo Modelling of Toxicity of Eight Commercial Artificial Sweeteners in Daphnia Neonates and Zebrafish Embryos through Cardiac Performance Assessments. Preprints 2020, 2020090419 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0419.v1).

Abstract

Artificial sweeteners are widely used food ingredients in beverages and drinks to lower calorie intake which in turn prevent lifestyle diseases such as obesity. Epidemiological evidences suggest that an overdose of artificial sweeteners could result to adverse effects after consumption. Thus, our study aims to systematically explore the potential adverse effects of eight commercial artificial sweeteners, including acesulfame-K, alitame, aspartame, sodium cyclamate, dulcin, neotame, saccharin and sucralose on cardiac performances of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Daphnia as model animals. Embryonic zebrafish and Daphnia were exposed to eight artificial sweeteners at 100 ppb concentrations and their cardiac performance (heart rate, ejection fraction, fractional shortening, stroke volume, cardiac output and heartbeat regularity) were measured and compared. Saccharin significantly increased the heart rate of zebrafish larvae while a significant decrease was observed in Daphnia. Significant increase was also noted in zebrafish heart rate variability after incubation in acesulfame K, dulcin, sodium cyclamate, and sucralose. However, a significant increase in Daphnia was only observed after incubation in dulcin. Based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering results, several artificial sweetener samples were species-specific to zebrafish and Daphnia. Our study demonstrates the potential adverse physiological effects of artificial sweeteners in cardiovascular systems of zebrafish larvae and Daphnia.

Subject Areas

artificial sweeteners; zebrafish; Daphnia; cardiac performance; toxicity

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.