Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Carbon Balance in Salt Marsh and Mangrove Ecosystems: A Global Synthesis

Version 1 : Received: 9 September 2020 / Approved: 10 September 2020 / Online: 10 September 2020 (11:22:38 CEST)

How to cite: Alongi, D.M. Carbon Balance in Salt Marsh and Mangrove Ecosystems: A Global Synthesis. Preprints 2020, 2020090236 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0236.v1). Alongi, D.M. Carbon Balance in Salt Marsh and Mangrove Ecosystems: A Global Synthesis. Preprints 2020, 2020090236 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0236.v1).

Abstract

Mangroves and salt marshes are among the most productive ecosystems in the global coastal ocean. Mangroves store more carbon (739 Mg CORG ha-1) than salt marshes (334 Mg CORG ha-1), but the latter sequester proportionally more (24%) net primary production (NPP) than mangroves (12%). Mangroves exhibit greater rates of gross primary production (GPP), above-ground net primary production (NPP) and plant respiration (RC) with higher PGPP/RC ratios, but salt marshes exhibit greater rates of below-ground NPP. Mangroves have greater rates of subsurface DIC production and, unlike salt marshes, exhibit significant microbial decomposition to a soil depth of 1 m. Salt marshes release more soil CH4 and export more dissolved CH4 , but mangroves release more CO2 from tidal waters and export greater amounts of POC, DOC and DIC to adjacent waters. Both ecosystems contribute only a small proportion of GPP, RE (ecosystem respiration) and NEP (net ecosystem production) to the global coastal ocean due to their small global area, but contribute 72% of air-sea CO2 exchange from the world’s wetlands and estuaries and contribute 34% of DIC export and 17% of DOC + POC export to the world’s coastal ocean. Thus, both wetland ecosystems contribute disproportionately to carbon flow of the global coastal ocean.

Subject Areas

Biogeochemistry; Carbon; Carbon balance; Ecosystem; Ecosystem processes; Mangrove; Salt marsh; Wetland

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