Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Does Immediate Removal of Urinary Catheter Prevent Urinary Morbidities Following Cesarean Section: A Prospective Randomized Study

Version 1 : Received: 6 September 2020 / Approved: 8 September 2020 / Online: 8 September 2020 (06:06:44 CEST)

How to cite: Maskey, U.; Marahatta, R.; Vaidya, B. Does Immediate Removal of Urinary Catheter Prevent Urinary Morbidities Following Cesarean Section: A Prospective Randomized Study. Preprints 2020, 2020090174 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0174.v1). Maskey, U.; Marahatta, R.; Vaidya, B. Does Immediate Removal of Urinary Catheter Prevent Urinary Morbidities Following Cesarean Section: A Prospective Randomized Study. Preprints 2020, 2020090174 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0174.v1).

Abstract

Objective: Urinary catheters are known cause of urinary morbidities. The longer the catheter is retained, the greater the risk for contamination and infection. An increasing body of literature suggests routine practice of catheterization and retaining it for 24 hours does not add any procedural advantage. Thus, we sought to study outcomes in relation to early vs. delayed removal of urinary catheters following cesarean section. Methods: We randomly assigned 116 patients into early and delayed removal of urinary catheter groups. In the early group, catheter was removed immediately after the procedure and in the delayed removal group, catheter was removed 24 hours later. Clinical outcomes were measured in terms of significant bacteriuria 72 hours postop, voiding difficulties, urinary retention, mobilization time, length of hospital stay, and patient satisfaction. Results: Study revealed higher incidence of bacteriuria in the delayed removal group (32.8% vs. 15.5%, P = 0.030). Urinary frequency was also higher (34.6% Vs. 8.6%, P=0.001). However, there were no difference between the two groups in other urinary complaints including dysuria and urgency (P = 0.103 & P = 0.087). Urinary retention was more frequent in the early group, but difference was not significant (P = 0.080). Patients with immediate removal of the urinary catheter had early ambulation and early discharge from hospital (P = 0.001 and P = 0.040) and were generally satisfied with the procedure (P= 0.010). Conclusion: Our study showed that immediate removal of urinary catheter was associated with lower urinary complications, shorter length of hospitalization and associated cost.

Subject Areas

cesarean section; urinary catheterization; urinary tract infection

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