Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Developing the Fitness of Law Enforcement Recruits during Academy Training

Version 1 : Received: 31 August 2020 / Approved: 1 September 2020 / Online: 1 September 2020 (12:07:42 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Maupin, D.J.; Schram, B.; Canetti, E.F.D.; Dawes, J.J.; Lockie, R.; Orr, R.M. Developing the Fitness of Law Enforcement Recruits during Academy Training. Sustainability 2020, 12, 7944. Maupin, D.J.; Schram, B.; Canetti, E.F.D.; Dawes, J.J.; Lockie, R.; Orr, R.M. Developing the Fitness of Law Enforcement Recruits during Academy Training. Sustainability 2020, 12, 7944.

Journal reference: Sustainability 2020, 12, 7944
DOI: 10.3390/su12197944

Abstract

Law enforcement is an intermittently physically demanding job, interspersed with long periods of sedentary activity. To prepare for the physical demands of the job, law enforcement agencies enlist recruits into academies with a focus on physical training. Often academies focus on aerobic based exercise despite anaerobic fitness being strongly correlated to occupational tasks. The objective of this article is to analyse the changes in fitness of police recruits during academy training. Initial and final fitness test results, encompassing muscular power, strength, endurance as well as aerobic and anaerobic fitness, were measured to analyse changes in fitness. Dependent t-tests showed significant increases (p < 0.05) across all fitness tests, with a trend towards larger increases in aerobic and muscle endurance-based tests. Recruits from this academy tended to have higher fitness results compared to other academies and were either average or below average compared to age matched standards in the general populations. Physical training should persist for recruits beyond the academy to continue develop fitness throughout their career. Academies should add a focus on muscular strength and power training as these measures relate to occupational tasks, which may better prepare recruits for demands they will be expected to face in the field.

Subject Areas

Conditioning; Police; Anaerobic Fitness

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.