Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Economic Accessibility of CO2 Sequestration Through Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) in the US

Version 1 : Received: 20 August 2020 / Approved: 21 August 2020 / Online: 21 August 2020 (11:15:15 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Langholtz, M.; Busch, I.; Kasturi, A.; Hilliard, M.R.; McFarlane, J.; Tsouris, C.; Mukherjee, S.; Omitaomu, O.A.; Kotikot, S.M.; Allen-Dumas, M.R.; DeRolph, C.R.; Davis, M.R.; Parish, E.S. The Economic Accessibility of CO2 Sequestration through Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) in the US. Land 2020, 9, 299. Langholtz, M.; Busch, I.; Kasturi, A.; Hilliard, M.R.; McFarlane, J.; Tsouris, C.; Mukherjee, S.; Omitaomu, O.A.; Kotikot, S.M.; Allen-Dumas, M.R.; DeRolph, C.R.; Davis, M.R.; Parish, E.S. The Economic Accessibility of CO2 Sequestration through Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) in the US. Land 2020, 9, 299.

Journal reference: Land 2020, 9, 299
DOI: 10.3390/land9090299

Abstract

Bioenergy with carbon capture and sequestration (BECCS) is one strategy to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. To assess the potential scale and cost of CO2 sequestration from BECCS in the US, this analysis models carbon efficiencies and costs of biomass production, delivery, power generation, and CO2 capture and sequestration in saline formations. The analysis includes two biomass supply scenarios (near-term and long-term), two biomass logistics scenarios (conventional and pelletized), two generation technologies (pulverized combustion and integrated gasification combined cycle), and three cost accounting scenarios (gross cost, net cost after electricity revenues, and net cost after electricity revenues with avoided emissions from conventional power generation). Results show cost Mg-1 CO2 as a function of CO2 sequestered (simulating capture up to 90% of total CO2 sequestration potential) and associated spatial distribution of resources and generation locations for the array of scenario options. Under a near-term scenario using 222 million Mg yr-1 of biomass, up to 196 million Mg CO2 can be sequestered at scenario-average costs ranging from $60 to $158 Mg 1 CO2; under a long-term scenario using 823 million Mg yr-1 of biomass, up to 727 million Mg CO2 yr 1 can be sequestered at scenario-average costs ranging from $32 to $242 Mg-1 CO2. These costs are largely influenced by cost accounting scenario, and the CO2 sequestration potential may be reduced if future competing demand reduces resource availability. Results suggest there are multiple feedstock-logistics-generation pathways toward CO2 drawdown that could be incrementally trialed and monitored for environmental sustainability effects. Interactive visualization of results is available at [final link to be determined].

Subject Areas

BECCS; bioenergy with carbon capture and sequestration; bioenergy; biopower; biomass resources; biomass logistics; biomass economics

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