Preprint Review Version 2 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Complementary Approaches to Understand Anthelmintic Resistance Using Free-Living and Parasitic Nematodes

Version 1 : Received: 13 August 2020 / Approved: 14 August 2020 / Online: 14 August 2020 (08:56:53 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 23 November 2020 / Approved: 25 November 2020 / Online: 25 November 2020 (14:47:29 CET)

How to cite: Wit, J.; Dilks, C.; Andersen, E. Complementary Approaches to Understand Anthelmintic Resistance Using Free-Living and Parasitic Nematodes. Preprints 2020, 2020080313 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0313.v2). Wit, J.; Dilks, C.; Andersen, E. Complementary Approaches to Understand Anthelmintic Resistance Using Free-Living and Parasitic Nematodes. Preprints 2020, 2020080313 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0313.v2).

Abstract

Anthelmintic drugs are the major line of defense against parasitic nematode infections, but the arsenal is limited and resistance threatens sustained efficacy of the available drugs. Discoveries of the modes of action of these drugs and mechanisms of resistance have predominantly come from studies of a related non-parasitic nematode species, Caenorhabditis elegans, and the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. Here, we discuss how our understanding of anthelmintic resistance and modes of action came from the interplay of results from each of these species. We argue that this “cycle of discovery”, where results from one species inform the design of experiments in the other, can use the complementary strengths of both to understand anthelmintic modes of action and mechanisms of resistance.

Subject Areas

drug resistance; natural diversity; C. elegans; anthelmintics

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 25 November 2020
Commenter: Clayton Dilks
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: We have rewritten the article to more explicitly focus on the cycle of discovery between C. elegans and H. contortus. We have remade the first figure to be more informative and include details of each species advantage. We also removed a large amount of background information and history throughout the review.
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