Preprint Communication Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Volatile Compounds Emitted from the Cat Urine Contaminated Carpet Before and After Treatment with Marketed Cleaning Products: A Simultaneous Chemical and Sensory Analysis

Version 1 : Received: 13 August 2020 / Approved: 13 August 2020 / Online: 13 August 2020 (08:51:58 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Banik, C.; Koziel, J.A.; Flickinger, E. Volatile Compounds Emitted from the Cat Urine Contaminated Carpet before and after Treatment with Marketed Cleaning Products: A Simultaneous Chemical and Sensory Analysis. Data 2020, 5, 88. Banik, C.; Koziel, J.A.; Flickinger, E. Volatile Compounds Emitted from the Cat Urine Contaminated Carpet before and after Treatment with Marketed Cleaning Products: A Simultaneous Chemical and Sensory Analysis. Data 2020, 5, 88.

Journal reference: Data 2020, 5, 88
DOI: 10.3390/data5040088

Abstract

Urination on carpet and subflooring can develop into persistent and challenging to mitigate odor. Very little or no information is published on how these VOCs change over time when urine is deposited on the carpet covering a plywood-type subflooring. This research has investigated the VOCs emitted from carpet+subflooring (control), carpet+subflooring sprayed with water (control with moisture), and cat urine-contaminated carpet+subflooring (treatment) over time (day 0 and 15). In addition, the effect of popular cleaning products on VOCs emitted and evaluated their efficacy in eliminating those indoor odors over time (day 0 and 15). Carpet-subflooring with all treatments were also contaminated with Micrococcus luteus, nonmotile obligate aerobe commonly found in household dust, to observe the impact of the aerobe on carpet-subflooring VOCs emission. VOCs emitted from carpet+subflooring receiving different treatments were collected from headspace using solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The VOCs were analyzed using a multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometer attached to an olfactometry (GC-MS-O). Many common VOCs were released from the carpet on day one and day fifteen, specifically from urine contamination. Cleaning products were effective in masking several potent odors of cat urine contaminated carpet VOCs on day one but unable to remove the odor appeared on day 15 in most cases.

Subject Areas

cat urine; odor mitigation; odor; volatile organic compounds; emission; indoor air quality, solid-phase microextraction; SPME; diffusion; Micrococcus luteus

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