Preprint Review Version 2 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Elevated CO2 and Water Stress in Combination in Plants: Brothers in Arms or Partners in Crime?

Version 1 : Received: 11 August 2020 / Approved: 12 August 2020 / Online: 12 August 2020 (13:27:02 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 1 July 2022 / Approved: 4 July 2022 / Online: 4 July 2022 (08:21:01 CEST)

How to cite: Shanker, A.; Gunnapaneni, D.; Bhanu, D.; Vanaja, M.; Jyothilakshmi, N.; Yadav, S.; Prabhakar, M.; Singh, V. Elevated CO2 and Water Stress in Combination in Plants: Brothers in Arms or Partners in Crime?. Preprints 2020, 2020080286 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0286.v2). Shanker, A.; Gunnapaneni, D.; Bhanu, D.; Vanaja, M.; Jyothilakshmi, N.; Yadav, S.; Prabhakar, M.; Singh, V. Elevated CO2 and Water Stress in Combination in Plants: Brothers in Arms or Partners in Crime?. Preprints 2020, 2020080286 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0286.v2).

Abstract

The changing dynamics in climate is the primary and important determinant of agriculture productivity. The effects of this changing climate on overall productivity in agriculture can be understood when we study the effects of individual components contributing to the changing climate on plants and crops. Elevated CO2 (eCO2) and drought due to high variability in rainfall is one of the important manifestations of the changing climate. There is a considerable amount of literature that addresses climate effects on plant systems from molecules to ecosystems. Of particular interest is the effect of increased CO2 on plants in relation to drought and water stress. As it is known that one of the consistent effects of increased CO2 in the atmosphere is increased photosynthesis, especially in C3 plants, it will be interesting to know the effect of drought in relation to elevated CO2. The potential of elevated CO2 ameliorating the effects of water deficit stress is evident from literature suggesting that these two are agents are brothers in arms protecting the plant from stress rather than partnering in crime, specifically water deficit when in isolation. The possible mechanisms by which this occurs will be discussed in this minireview. Interpreting the effects of short-term and long-term exposure of plants to elevated CO2 in the context of ameliorating the negative impacts of drought will show us the possible ways by which there can be effective adaption to crops in the changing climate scenario.

Keywords

elevated CO2; drought; photosynthesis; transpiration rate; stomatal conductance; C4 enzymes; malate; water deficit stress; abscisic acid

Subject

BIOLOGY, Agricultural Sciences & Agronomy

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 4 July 2022
Commenter: Arun Shanker
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: The review has been improved much by adding different sub headings and adding new references and more critical analysis of the literature. Three additional figures have been added, one showing the molecular basis of elevated CO2 and drought mediated stomatal closure, another figure showing a schematic representation of individual and interactive effects of water deficit stress and eCO2 in C3 and C4 plants. Another figure was developed by homolgy modelling of the C4 enzymes showing Homology models of NADP-ME and NAD-ME enzymes with their beta-hairpin bends. A table was also added showing structureal differences of the C4 enzymes.
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