Preprint Article Version 2 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Spatial Variability of Atmosphere Dust Fallout Flux in Urban-industrial Environments

Version 1 : Received: 6 August 2020 / Approved: 7 August 2020 / Online: 7 August 2020 (10:13:38 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 10 September 2020 / Approved: 11 September 2020 / Online: 11 September 2020 (06:01:45 CEST)

How to cite: Dinis, M.L.; Gonçalves, M.I. Spatial Variability of Atmosphere Dust Fallout Flux in Urban-industrial Environments. Preprints 2020, 2020080184 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0184.v2). Dinis, M.L.; Gonçalves, M.I. Spatial Variability of Atmosphere Dust Fallout Flux in Urban-industrial Environments. Preprints 2020, 2020080184 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0184.v2).

Abstract

This work aimed to assess and characterize the air quality in what concerns particulate pollution in urban-industrial environments. The main objectives were to study the spatial variability of the deposition flux of particulate pollution identifying areas with higher deposition, associate the variability with climatological variables and with possible surrounding emitting sources. The method for collecting the deposited particles was based on the standard NF X 43-007. Sampling for particulate pollution took place between April 2015 and February 2016, through seven sampling campaigns. Maps of the spatial dispersion for the particulate pollution were obtained through statistics and geostatistics techniques. Elemental identification by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also used but only in two sampling campaigns. The results show that the sampling campaigns that took place during hot and dry periods, 2nd and 3rd, present higher deposition flux: 2.04 g/(m2 x month) and 1.72 g/(m2 x month), respectively. Lower deposition fluxes were registered in the 6th and 7th campaigns: 0.23 g/(m2 x month) and 0.24 g/(m2 x month), respectively. It was also observed a recurrent high deposition at specific sampling points which may be due to both the nearby road traffic and the presence of chimneys. SEM analysis allowed to associate repetitive element deposition, at the same sampling point, to the same emitting source.

Subject Areas

particulate pollution; air quality; deposition flux; geostatistics; ordinary kriging; urban-industrial; elemental identification; electronic scanning microscopy

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