Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Training of Primary Chicken Monocytes Results in Enhanced Pro-inflammatory Responses

Version 1 : Received: 24 July 2020 / Approved: 25 July 2020 / Online: 25 July 2020 (18:00:05 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Verwoolde, M.B.; van den Biggelaar, R.H.G.A.; van Baal, J.; Jansen, C.A.; Lammers, A. Training of Primary Chicken Monocytes Results in Enhanced Pro-Inflammatory Responses. Vet. Sci. 2020, 7, 115. Verwoolde, M.B.; van den Biggelaar, R.H.G.A.; van Baal, J.; Jansen, C.A.; Lammers, A. Training of Primary Chicken Monocytes Results in Enhanced Pro-Inflammatory Responses. Vet. Sci. 2020, 7, 115.

Journal reference: Vet. Sci. 2020, 7, 115
DOI: 10.3390/vetsci7030115

Abstract

Beta-glucan-stimulated mammalian macrophages show an increased responsiveness to secondary stimulation in a nonspecific manner. This phenomenon is known as trained innate immunity. Our study aimed to explore training of primary chicken monocytes. We hypothesized that primary chicken monocytes, similar to their mammalian counterparts, can be trained with β-glucan resulting in increased responses of these cells to a secondary stimulus. Primary blood monocytes of white leghorn chickens were primary stimulated with β-glucan microparticulates (M-βG), LPS, recombinant chicken interleukin-4 (IL-4) or combinations of these components for 48 h. On day 6, the primary stimulated cells were secondary stimulated with LPS. Nitric oxide (NO) production levels were measured as an indicator of pro-inflammatory activity. In addition, the cells were analysed by flow cytometry to characterize the population of trained cells and to investigate the expression of surface markers associated with activation. After the secondary LPS stimulation, surface expression of CSF1R and the activation markers CD40 and MHC-II was higher on macrophages that were trained with a combination of M-βG and IL-4 compared to unstimulated cells. This increased expression was paralleled by enhanced NO production. In conclusion, this study showed that trained innate immunity can be induced in primary chicken monocytes with β-glucan, which is in line with previous experiments in mammalian species. Innate immune training may have potential to improve health and vaccination strategies within the poultry sector.

Subject Areas

Innate immune memory; inflammatory response; β-glucan; flow cytometry; primary chicken monocytes; macrophages

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