Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Coronavirus Antiviral Research Database (CoV-RDB): An Online Database Designed to Facilitate Comparisons Between Candidate Anti-Coronavirus Compounds

Version 1 : Received: 21 July 2020 / Approved: 23 July 2020 / Online: 23 July 2020 (11:43:46 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Tzou, P.L.; Tao, K.; Nouhin, J.; Rhee, S.-Y.; Hu, B.D.; Pai, S.; Parkin, N.; Shafer, R.W. Coronavirus Antiviral Research Database (CoV-RDB): An Online Database Designed to Facilitate Comparisons between Candidate Anti-Coronavirus Compounds. Viruses 2020, 12, 1006. Tzou, P.L.; Tao, K.; Nouhin, J.; Rhee, S.-Y.; Hu, B.D.; Pai, S.; Parkin, N.; Shafer, R.W. Coronavirus Antiviral Research Database (CoV-RDB): An Online Database Designed to Facilitate Comparisons between Candidate Anti-Coronavirus Compounds. Viruses 2020, 12, 1006.

Journal reference: Viruses 2020, 12, 1006
DOI: 10.3390/v12091006

Abstract

Background: To prioritize the development of antiviral compounds, it is necessary to compare their relative preclinical activity and clinical efficacy. Methods: We reviewed in vitro, animal model, and clinical studies of candidate anti-coronavirus compounds and placed extracted data in an online relational database. Results: As of July 2020, the Coronavirus Antiviral Research Database (CoV-RDB; covdb.stanford.edu) contained >2,400 cell culture, entry assay and biochemical experiments, 240 animal model studies, and 56 clinical studies from >300 published papers. SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV account for approximately 85% of the data. Approximately 75% of experiments involved compounds with a known or likely mechanism of action, including receptor binding inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies (20%); viral protease inhibitors (18%); polymerase inhibitors (9%); interferons (8%); fusion inhibitors (8%); host endosomal trafficking inhibitors (7%); and host protease inhibitors (5%). For 724 compounds with a known or likely mechanism, 95 (13%) are licensed in the US for other indications, 72 (10%) are licensed outside the US or are in human trials, and 557 (77%) are pre-clinical investigational compounds. Conclusion: CoV-RDB facilitates comparisons between different candidate antiviral compounds, thereby helping scientists, clinical investigators, public health officials, and funding agencies prioritize the most promising compounds and repurposed drugs for further development.

Subject Areas

Coronavirus; COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; SARS-CoV; MERS-CoV; Antiviral therapy

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