Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Neuroscience Needs Ethology: The Marked Example of the Moth Pheromone System

Version 1 : Received: 15 July 2020 / Approved: 16 July 2020 / Online: 16 July 2020 (13:21:38 CEST)

How to cite: Thevenon, H. Neuroscience Needs Ethology: The Marked Example of the Moth Pheromone System. Preprints 2020, 2020070357 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202007.0357.v1). Thevenon, H. Neuroscience Needs Ethology: The Marked Example of the Moth Pheromone System. Preprints 2020, 2020070357 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202007.0357.v1).

Abstract

The key premise of translational studies is that knowledge gained in one animal species can be transposed to other animals. So far translational bridges have mainly relied on genetic and physiological similarities, in experimental setups where behaviours and environment are often oversimplified. These simplifications were recently criticised for decreasing the intrinsic value of the published results. The inclusion of wild behaviour and rich environments in neuroscience experimental designs is difficult to achieve because no animal model has it all. As an example, the genetic toolkit of moths species is virtually non-existent when compared to C. elegans, rats, mice, or zebrafish, however the balance is reversed for wild behaviours. The ethological knowledge gathered about the moth was instrumental for designing natural-like auditory stimuli, that were used in association with electrophysiology in order to understand how moths use these variable sounds produced by their predators in order to trump death. Conversely, we are still stuck with understanding how male moths make sense of their complex and diffuse olfactory landscape in order to locate conspecific females up to several hundred meters away, and precisely identify a conspecific in a sympatric swarm in order to reproduce. This systemic review articulates the ethological knowledge pertaining to this unresolved problem and leverages the paradigm to gain insight into how male moths process sparse and uncertain environmental sensory information.

Subject Areas

moth; pheromone; noctuid

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 8 August 2020
Commenter: Sergey Pushkin (Click to see Publons profile: )
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: this study focuses on important questions of insect ethology. Undoubtedly, it will be in demand by a wide range of specialists in the field of biology and entomologists. Hopefully we'll see the final version of this article soon. As a person interested in the mechanisms of behavior of social insects, it was useful for me to read this study.
+ Respond to this comment

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 1
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.