Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Impact of Microbes in Plant Immunity: Sustainable Approach for Crop Protection

Version 1 : Received: 3 July 2020 / Approved: 5 July 2020 / Online: 5 July 2020 (11:35:04 CEST)

How to cite: Singh, P. The Impact of Microbes in Plant Immunity: Sustainable Approach for Crop Protection. Preprints 2020, 2020070068 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202007.0068.v1). Singh, P. The Impact of Microbes in Plant Immunity: Sustainable Approach for Crop Protection. Preprints 2020, 2020070068 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202007.0068.v1).

Abstract

One of the biggest demanding situations for food security in the 21st century is to enhance crop yield stability through the improvement of diseases-resistant crops. Managing plant health is a major challenge for modern food production and compounded by the lack of common ground among the many disease control disciplines involved. All plants simultaneously engage with billions of microbes which can be collectively referred to as the plant microbiome. Most microbes inside the plant microbiome are harmless or even beneficial to the plant as they promote plant growth or provide protection in opposition to diseases. However, some of these microbes also cause disease with devastating effects on crop yields. To prevent pathogen infection, plants have evolved an advanced innate immune system that recognizes conserved cell surface molecules that most pathogen possesses. Activation of the plant immune system stops the invading pathogen, however this comes with fitness cost that significantly reduces plant growth and leads to yield penalty. Apart from their innate immune system controlling pre-programmed defense reactions, plants can also increase the responsiveness of their immune system in response to selected environmental signals. This phenomenon is known as “defense priming”. Although defense priming rarely provides full protection, its broad-spectrum effectiveness, low-fitness cost, long‐lasting durability and inherited to future generations make it attractive for sustainable crop protection.

Subject Areas

Microbiome; Plant Immunity; Priming; Transgenerational Immune Priming (TGIP)

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