Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

An ERA-Based Study of Built Environment Factors Affecting Lung Cancer Incidence Rate among Chinese Women

Version 1 : Received: 18 May 2020 / Approved: 20 May 2020 / Online: 20 May 2020 (09:06:39 CEST)

How to cite: Xie, H.; Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, X.; zhang, P. An ERA-Based Study of Built Environment Factors Affecting Lung Cancer Incidence Rate among Chinese Women. Preprints 2020, 2020050323 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202005.0323.v1). Xie, H.; Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, X.; zhang, P. An ERA-Based Study of Built Environment Factors Affecting Lung Cancer Incidence Rate among Chinese Women. Preprints 2020, 2020050323 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202005.0323.v1).

Abstract

Objective: Application of ERA methods to investigate the atmospheric pollution and built environment factors influencing lung cancer incidence rate in Chinese women. Methods: Lung cancer incidence rate among Chinese women at 339 cancer registries were obtained from the China Cancer Registry Annual Report 2017, air quality and built environment data were obtained from the Greenpeace and China Construction Yearbook. After multiple covariates variables were eliminated, an exploratory regression analysis was performed using the world standardized population incidence rate as the dependent variable. Air quality and built environment factors as the independent variable. Results: Shandong Peninsula, Hebei and Liaoning are high incidence rate areas of female lung cancer in China, with significant regional aggregation. In addition to air quality factors such as industrial smoke emission data, the association between built environmental factors such as urbanization rate, development LUI, population density and greening coverage of built-up areas and female lung cancer incidence rate is statistically significant. Conclusion: In addition to air quality factors, urban spatial factors can also significantly affect respiratory health. The LUI is positively while urbanization rates and population density are negatively correlated with the incidence rate of lung cancer. The role of green space for respiratory health has not been proven. In addition, there is little relationship between income and health, and similar findings are found for indicators such as the public transportation and roads network.

Subject Areas

exploratory regression analysis; built environment; influencing factors; incidence rate for female lung cancer

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