Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Analysis of the Human Breast Milk Microbiome and Bacterial Extracellular Vesicles in Healthy Mothers

Version 1 : Received: 21 April 2020 / Approved: 23 April 2020 / Online: 23 April 2020 (05:11:19 CEST)

How to cite: Kim, S.Y.; Yi, D.Y. Analysis of the Human Breast Milk Microbiome and Bacterial Extracellular Vesicles in Healthy Mothers. Preprints 2020, 2020040404 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202004.0404.v1). Kim, S.Y.; Yi, D.Y. Analysis of the Human Breast Milk Microbiome and Bacterial Extracellular Vesicles in Healthy Mothers. Preprints 2020, 2020040404 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202004.0404.v1).

Abstract

The microbiota of human breast milk (HBM) contributes to infant gut colonization; however, whether bacterial extracellular vesicles (EVs) are present in HBM or might contribute to this process remains unknown. In the present study, we characterized the HBM microbiota of healthy Korean mothers and measured the key bacteria likely affecting infant gut colonization by analyzing both the microbiota and bacterial EVs. A total of 22 HBM samples were collected from lactating mothers. The DNA of bacteria and bacteria-derived EVs was extracted from each sample. Gene analysis was performed using Illumina MiSeq. Firmicutes accounted for the largest portion among the phyla, followed by Proteobacteria, Bacteroides, and Actinobacteria in both bacteria and bacterial EV samples. At the genus level, Streptococcus (25.1%) and Staphylococcus (10.7%) were predominant in bacterial samples, whereas Bacteroides (9.1%), Acinetobacter (6.9%), and Lactobacillaceae(f) (5.5%) were prevalent in bacterial EV samples. Several genera including Bifidobacterium were significantly positively correlated between the two samples. Our findings reveal the diverse bacterial communities in HBM of healthy lactating mothers and suggest the presence of key bacteria with metabolic activity in HBM and that EVs derived from these bacteria may contribute to the vertical transfer of gut microbiota from mother to infant.

Subject Areas

milk; human; microbiota; microbiome; extracellular vesicle; breastfeeding

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