Working Paper Review Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

A Systematic Review of Neuroimaging and Acute Cannabis Exposure in Age-of-Risk for Psychosis

Version 1 : Received: 20 April 2020 / Approved: 21 April 2020 / Online: 21 April 2020 (10:23:52 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 6 May 2021 / Approved: 14 May 2021 / Online: 14 May 2021 (09:58:14 CEST)

How to cite: Cupo, L.; Plitman, E.; Guma, E.; Chakravarty, M.M. A Systematic Review of Neuroimaging and Acute Cannabis Exposure in Age-of-Risk for Psychosis. Preprints 2020, 2020040386 Cupo, L.; Plitman, E.; Guma, E.; Chakravarty, M.M. A Systematic Review of Neuroimaging and Acute Cannabis Exposure in Age-of-Risk for Psychosis. Preprints 2020, 2020040386

Abstract

Acute exposure to cannabis has been associated with an array of cognitive alterations, increased risk for neuropsychiatric illness, and other neuropsychiatric sequelae including the emergence of acute psychotic symptoms. However, the brain alterations associating cannabis use and these behavioral and clinical phenotypes remains disputed. To this end, neuroimaging can be a powerful technique to non-invasively study the impact of cannabis exposure on brain structure and function in both humans and animal models. While chronic exposure studies provide insight into how use may be related to long-term outcomes, acute exposure may reveal interesting information regarding the immediate impact of use and abuse on brain circuits. Understanding these alterations could reveal the connection with symptom dimensions in neuropsychiatric disorders and, more specifically with psychosis. The purpose of the present review is to: 1) provide an update on the findings of pharmacological neuroimaging studies examining the effects of administered cannabinoids and 2) focus the discussion on studies that examine the sensitive window for the emergence of psychosis. Current literature indicates that cannabis exposure has varied effects on the brain, with the principal compounds in cannabis (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol) altering activity across different brain regions. Importantly, we also discorvered critical gaps in the literature, particularly regarding sex-dependent responses and long-term effects of chronic exposure. Certain networks often characterized as dysregulated in psychosis, like the default mode network and limbic system, were also impacted by THC exposure, identifying areas of particular interest for future work investigating the potential relationship between the two.

Subject Areas

systematic review; cannabis; neuroimaging; age-of-onset psychosis; psychosis; schizophrenia

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 14 May 2021
Commenter: Lani Cupo
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: Paper was published by Translational Psychiatry. I am updating the preprint to reflect the reviewers' comments.
+ Respond to this comment

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 1
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.