Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Anosmia and Ageusia as Initial or Unique Symptoms after SARS-COV-2 Virus Infection

Version 1 : Received: 9 April 2020 / Approved: 16 April 2020 / Online: 16 April 2020 (12:42:44 CEST)

How to cite: Machado, C.; Gutierrez, J.V. Anosmia and Ageusia as Initial or Unique Symptoms after SARS-COV-2 Virus Infection. Preprints 2020, 2020040272 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202004.0272.v1). Machado, C.; Gutierrez, J.V. Anosmia and Ageusia as Initial or Unique Symptoms after SARS-COV-2 Virus Infection. Preprints 2020, 2020040272 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202004.0272.v1).

Abstract

SARS-CoV-2 (CoV-2) is a coronavirus which is causing the actual COVID-19 pandemic. The disease caused by 2019 new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) was named coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) by the World Health Organization in February 2020. Primary non-specific reported symptoms of 2019-nCoV infection at the prodromal phase are malaise, fever, and dry cough. The most commonly reported signs and symptoms are fever (98%), cough (76%), dyspnea (55%), and myalgia or fatigue (44%). Nonetheless, recent reports suggest an association between COVID-19 and altered olfactory and taste functions, although smell seems to be more affected than taste. These associations of smell and taste dysfunctions and CoV-2 are consistent with case reports describing a patient with SARS with long term anosmia after recovery from respiratory distress, with the observation that olfactory function is commonly altered after infection with endemic coronaviruses, and with data demonstrating that intentional experimental infection of humans with CoV-299 raises the thresholds at which odors can be detected. Post-viral anosmia and is one of the leading causes of loss of sense of smell in adults, accounting for up to 40% cases of anosmia. Viruses that give rise to the common cold are well known to cause post-infectious loss, and over 200 different viruses are known to cause upper respiratory tract infections. I reviewed the possible mechanisms of smell and taste loss in COVID-19. I concluded that since the existence of such a relationship is likely, it is highly recommended that those patients who experience complications such as smell and/or taste loss, even as unique symptoms, should be considered as potential SARS-CoV-2 virus carriers.

Subject Areas

SARS-CoV-2 (CoV-2); COVID-19; coronavirus; pandemic; smell; anosmia; taste; ageusia

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.