Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Small Intestine, an Underestimated Site of SARS-CoV-2 Infection: From Red Queen Effect to Probiotics

Version 1 : Received: 7 March 2020 / Approved: 10 March 2020 / Online: 10 March 2020 (08:45:34 CET)

How to cite: Feng, Z.; Wang, Y.; Qi, W. The Small Intestine, an Underestimated Site of SARS-CoV-2 Infection: From Red Queen Effect to Probiotics. Preprints 2020, 2020030161 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202003.0161.v1). Feng, Z.; Wang, Y.; Qi, W. The Small Intestine, an Underestimated Site of SARS-CoV-2 Infection: From Red Queen Effect to Probiotics. Preprints 2020, 2020030161 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202003.0161.v1).

Abstract

Understanding how the coronaviruses invade our body is an essential point, and the expression profile of coronaviruses receptor may help us to find where the coronavirus infects our body. We found that the coronavirus receptors, including angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) for SARS-CoV and SARS-Cov-2, are digestion-related enzymes in human enterocytes. Coronaviruses are continually altering the binding receptor and binding modes during their evolution, but the potential target cell in the small intestine is constant when in the lung is inconstant. Enterocytes may act as a conserved cell reservoir for coronaviruses, which may be partially explained by the Red Queen hypothesis. We also found that coronaviruses receptors could be elevated in the presence of both invasive bacteria and their counterpart, probiotics. We demonstrated here that enterocytes act as a conserved cell reservoir for coronaviruses during their evolutions, which should not be ignored in the investigation of coronavirus diagnosis and treatment strategies.

Subject Areas

coronaviruses receptors; angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2); COVID-19; SARS-Cov-2; the Red Queen hypothesis; segmented filamentous bacteria

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 14 April 2020
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: Hello, would it then be advisable to give probiotics to people suspected of being infected? and would this theory explain diarrhea?
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