Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Nomenclature: Coronavirus and the 2019 Novel Coronavirus

Version 1 : Received: 25 February 2020 / Approved: 25 February 2020 / Online: 25 February 2020 (12:33:45 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 4 March 2020 / Approved: 4 March 2020 / Online: 4 March 2020 (11:25:59 CET)
Version 3 : Received: 14 March 2020 / Approved: 16 March 2020 / Online: 16 March 2020 (15:12:33 CET)

How to cite: Hu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Li, Q.; Huang, Y. Nomenclature: Coronavirus and the 2019 Novel Coronavirus. Preprints 2020, 2020020380 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202002.0380.v1). Hu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Li, Q.; Huang, Y. Nomenclature: Coronavirus and the 2019 Novel Coronavirus. Preprints 2020, 2020020380 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202002.0380.v1).

Abstract

Less aligned emphasis has been given to naming the 2019 novel coronavirus and pandemic disease. Global profusion of squab names has found their ways in daily communication, and our survey promises to articulate that many of them may have contributed to backlash against Chinese people. Here, based on brief critical reviews on the naming of coronavirus and human coronaviruses, we scrutinize a clear sense of pros and cons of previous multifarious names and punctuate heuristic introspection of naming practices. Our findings suggest that full-fledged official names are duly contribute to the resilience of healthy collective usages in current infodemic scenario.

Subject Areas

human coronaviruses (HCoVs); infodemic; PHEIC; 2019-nCoV; COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 26 February 2020
Commenter: Zhiwen Hu
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: '''[Update]''' In academic-industrial sphere, the arguments of naming the 2019 novel coronavirus and pathogenic disease flew to and fro, and nothing seemed certain or obviously right. In real dilemma, layered on top of this, making informed and judicious choice is a catch-22 for each authoritative body. References: 1. F. Wu et al., A new coronavirus associated with human respiratory disease in China. Nature (2020), doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2008-3. 2. L.-F. Wang, D. E. Anderson, J. S. Mackenzie, M. H. Merson, From Hendra to Wuhan: what has been learned in responding to emerging zoonotic viruses. Lancet. 395, e33–e34 (2020). 3. Stop the Wuhan virus. Nature. 577, 450–450 (2020). 4. E. Callaway, D. Cyranoski, Why snakes probably aren’t spreading the new China virus. Nature (2020), doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00180-8. 5. E. Callaway, D. Cyranoski, China coronavirus: Six questions scientists are asking. Nature. 577, 605–607 (2020). 6. E. Callaway, China coronavirus: labs worldwide scramble to analyse live samples. Nature. 578, 16–16 (2020). 7. D. Cyranoski, Did pangolins spread the China coronavirus to people? Nature (2020), doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00364-2. 8. S.-L. Liu, L. Saif, Emerging Viruses without Borders: The Wuhan Coronavirus. Viruses. 12, 130 (2020). 9. J. Parry, China coronavirus: cases surge as official admits human to human transmission. Br. Med. J. 368, m236 (2020). 10. E. Mahase, China coronavirus: what do we know so far? Br. Med. J. 368, m308 (2020). 11. E. Mahase, China coronavirus: WHO declares international emergency as death toll exceeds 200. Br. Med. J. 368, m408 (2020). 12. M. Bassetti, A. Vena, D. R. Giacobbe, The novel Chinese coronavirus (2019-nCoV) infections: Challenges for fighting the storm. Eur. J. Clin. Invest., e13209 (2020). 13. S.-L. Liu, L. Saif, Emerging Viruses without Borders: The Wuhan Coronavirus. Viruses. 12 (2020), doi:10.3390/v12020130. 14. V. C. C. Cheng, S.-C. Wong, K. K. W. To, P. L. Ho, K.-Y. Yuen, Preparedness and proactive infection control measures against the emerging Wuhan coronavirus pneumonia in China. J. Hosp. Infect. (2020), doi:10.1016/j.jhin.2020.01.010. 15. R. Ralph et al., 2019-nCoV (Wuhan virus), a novel Coronavirus: human-to-human transmission, travel-related cases, and vaccine readiness. J. Infect. Dev. Ctries. 14, 3–17 (2020). 16. E. Callaway, China coronavirus: labs worldwide scramble to analyse live samples. Nature. 578, 16 (2020). 17. Y. Cai et al., Application of RNAscope technology to studying the infection dynamics of a Chinese porcine epidemic diarrhea virus variant strain BJ2011C in neonatal piglets. Vet. Microbiol. 235, 220–228 (2019). 18. E. Mahase, China coronavirus: mild but infectious cases may make it hard to control outbreak, report warns. Br. Med. J. 368, m325 (2020). 19. J. Parry, China coronavirus: partial border closures into Hong Kong are not enough, say doctors. Br. Med. J. 368, m349 (2020). 20. T. Zhou et al., Preliminary prediction of the basic reproduction number of the Wuhan novel coronavirus 2019-nCoV. J. Evid. Based. Med. (2020), doi:10.1111/jebm.12376. 21. J. Parry, China coronavirus: Hong Kong health staff strike to demand border closure as city records first death. Br. Med. J. 368, m454 (2020).
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