Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Determinants of the Adoption of Sustainable Intensification in Southern African Farming Systems: A Meta-Analysis

Version 1 : Received: 22 January 2020 / Approved: 23 January 2020 / Online: 23 January 2020 (14:03:51 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Guo, Q.; Ola, O.; Benjamin, E.O. Determinants of the Adoption of Sustainable Intensification in Southern African Farming Systems: A Meta-Analysis. Sustainability 2020, 12, 3276. Guo, Q.; Ola, O.; Benjamin, E.O. Determinants of the Adoption of Sustainable Intensification in Southern African Farming Systems: A Meta-Analysis. Sustainability 2020, 12, 3276.

Journal reference: Sustainability 2020, 12, 3276
DOI: 10.3390/su12083276

Abstract

Climate change and environmental degradation are major threats to sustainable agricultural development in Southern Africa. Thus, the concept of sustainable intensification (SI) i.e. getting more output from less input using certain practices such as agroforestry, organic fertilizer, sustainable water management etc. has become an important topic among researchers and policy makers in the region in the last three decades. A comprehensive review of literatures on the adoption of SI in the region identify nine relevant drivers of adoption of SI among (smallholder) farmers. These drivers include (i) age, (ii) size of arable land, (iii) education, (iv) extension services, (v) gender, (vi) household size, (vii) income, (viii) membership in farming organization and (ix) access to credit. We present the results of a meta-analysis of 21 papers on the impact of these determinants on SI adoption among (smallholder) farmers in Southern African Development Community (SADC) using random-effects estimation techniques for the true effect size. While our result suggests that variables such as extension services, education, age, and household size may influence the adoption of SI in SADC, factors such as access to credit is also of great importance. Decision-makers should therefore concentrate efforts on these factors in promoting SI across the SADC. This includes increasing the efficiency of public extension service as well as involvement of private sector in extension service. Furthermore, both public and private agriculture financing models should consider sustainability indicators in their assessment process.

Subject Areas

climate change; sustainable intensification (SI); smallholders; meta-analysis; random-effect model; Adoption, Southern Africa Development Community (SADC); effect size

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