Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Disparities in Smoking Cessation Outcomes among Multi-ethnic Pregnant Smokers in San Bernardino County, CA: Findings from the Loma Linda University Health Comprehensive Tobacco Treatment Program

Version 1 : Received: 14 January 2020 / Approved: 15 January 2020 / Online: 15 January 2020 (12:15:54 CET)

How to cite: Petersen, A.B.; Ogunrinu, T.; Wallace, S.; Yun, J.; Belliard, J.C.; Singh, P. Disparities in Smoking Cessation Outcomes among Multi-ethnic Pregnant Smokers in San Bernardino County, CA: Findings from the Loma Linda University Health Comprehensive Tobacco Treatment Program. Preprints 2020, 2020010150 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202001.0150.v1). Petersen, A.B.; Ogunrinu, T.; Wallace, S.; Yun, J.; Belliard, J.C.; Singh, P. Disparities in Smoking Cessation Outcomes among Multi-ethnic Pregnant Smokers in San Bernardino County, CA: Findings from the Loma Linda University Health Comprehensive Tobacco Treatment Program. Preprints 2020, 2020010150 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202001.0150.v1).

Abstract

Smoking during pregnancy remains one of the most significant risk factors for poor birth outcomes. The Loma Linda University Health Comprehensive Tobacco Treatment Program (CTTP) is the largest maternal tobacco cessation program in San Bernardino County – the largest county in the contiguous US. CTTP is an eight week, incentivized, behavioral intervention for tobacco cessation for pregnant smokers. As part of program evaluation, we used a retrospective cohort design to assess smoking abstinence and to identify predictors of relapse/smoking after enrollment. Among CTTP cohort enrollees (n=233) from 2012-2013 we found: 1) a 28.4% 8 week point prevalence abstinence (PPA), and at a median of 9 months of follow-up after the PPA, 81.6% continued to indicate tobacco cessation, and 2) a high rate of relapse or loss to follow-up (56%). Our modeling of relapse/smoking after enrollment indicated that this was higher in young mothers, non-Hispanic mothers (White, Black), first/third trimester mothers, and rural mothers. The evaluation identified efficacy of the behavioral model at 8 weeks, but that relapse/smoking was occurring in disparity populations. Formative research is needed to expand the programmatic outreach and enrollment of mothers wanting to quit smoking.

Subject Areas

maternal smoking; post partum smoking; health education

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