Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Essential Amino Acid Supplement Lowers Intrahepatic Lipid despite Excess Alcohol Consumption

Version 1 : Received: 16 December 2019 / Approved: 20 December 2019 / Online: 20 December 2019 (06:44:08 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Coker, M.S.; Ladd, K.R.; Kim, J.; Murphy, C.J.; DeCort, R.; Newcomer, B.R.; Wolfe, R.R.; Coker, R.H. Essential Amino Acid Supplement Lowers Intrahepatic Lipid despite Excess Alcohol Consumption. Nutrients 2020, 12, 254. Coker, M.S.; Ladd, K.R.; Kim, J.; Murphy, C.J.; DeCort, R.; Newcomer, B.R.; Wolfe, R.R.; Coker, R.H. Essential Amino Acid Supplement Lowers Intrahepatic Lipid despite Excess Alcohol Consumption. Nutrients 2020, 12, 254.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2020, 12, 254
DOI: 10.3390/nu12010254

Abstract

Excess alcohol consumption is a top risk factor for death and disability. Fatty liver will likely develop and the risk of liver disease increases. We have previously demonstrated that an essential amino acid supplement (EAAS) improved protein synthesis and reduced intrahepatic lipid in the elderly. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the influence of EAAS on intrahepatic lipid (IHL), body composition, and blood lipids in individuals with mild to moderate alcohol use disorder (AUD). Following consent, determination of eligibility, and medical screening, 25 participants (18 males at 38±15 years/age and 7 females at 34±18 years/age) were enrolled and randomly assigned to one of two dosages: a low dose (LD: 8 grams of EAAS twice/day (BID)) or high dose (HD: 13 grams of EAAS BID). Both groups consumed the supplement for 4 weeks. Pre- and post-EAAS administration, IHL was determined using magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy, body composition was analyzed using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, and blood parameters were measured by LabCorp. T-tests were used for statistical analysis and considered significant at P<0.05. While there was no significant change in IHL in the LD group, there was a significant 23% reduction in IHL in the HD group (p=0.02). Fat mass, lean tissue mass, bone mineral content, and blood lipids were not altered. Post-EAAS phosphatidylethanol was elevated and remained unchanged in LD at 407±141 ng/ml and HD at 429±196 ng/ml, indicating chronic and excess alcohol consumption. Based on these results, we conclude that 13 grams of proprietary EAAS consumed BID lowers IHL in individuals with mild to moderate AUD.

Subject Areas

amino acids; liver; alcohol

Comments (2)

Comment 1
Received: 22 December 2019
Commenter: Abdulla A.B. Badawy
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: The authors present an interesting study of the effects of essential amino acids on hepatic lipids, which may have important therapeutic implications. I have a few comments, which I hope will be helpful. (1) Surprisingly, the composition of the essential amino acid mixture is not presented in the paper. It is important to know how much of each AA is present, as some amino acids exert specific effects on body systems that can impact lipid metabolism. On the other hand, the liver dysfunction can influence the disposition and metabolic pathways of certain amino acids, e.g. Trp. A quick review of the literature regarding the effects of essential amino acids on lipids and processes that impact their metabolism would help advance the Discussion and provide guidance to future research. (2) Plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) were not measured. A potential elevation of their levels coupled with their decreased oxidation in fatty livers could impact mitochondrial function and also the immune system.
+ Respond to this comment
Response 1 to Comment 1
Received: 25 December 2019
Commenter: Robert H. Coker
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Drs. Coker and Wolfe are Managing Partners and Co-Owners of Essential Blends, LLC that have received funding through the Small Business Innovations in Research from the National Institutes of Health to develop clinical nutrition products.
Comment: Thank you for your helpful comments.

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 2
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.