Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Effect Long-Term Exposure to Different Doses of Lipopolysaccharides on the Intestinal Mucosal Immune Barrier

Version 1 : Received: 28 October 2019 / Approved: 29 October 2019 / Online: 29 October 2019 (10:50:10 CET)

How to cite: Li, C.; Zhao, B.; Wu, C. Effect Long-Term Exposure to Different Doses of Lipopolysaccharides on the Intestinal Mucosal Immune Barrier. Preprints 2019, 2019100335 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201910.0335.v1). Li, C.; Zhao, B.; Wu, C. Effect Long-Term Exposure to Different Doses of Lipopolysaccharides on the Intestinal Mucosal Immune Barrier. Preprints 2019, 2019100335 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201910.0335.v1).

Abstract

The small intestinal villus is covered with a thick layer of mucus that is secreted by goblet cells and functions primarily to first barrier from damage by toxic substance. Recent studies showed that goblet cells and mucins involved in complex immune function. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is widespread in the housing of livestock, which can induce bacterial infection symptoms and immunological stress within a short of time. Therefore, we aimed to study the effects of long-term exposure to different doses of LPS on intestinal mucus layer and immune barrier. The result showed that mucus layer thickness and goblet cell functions were significantly increased after low doses of LPS. The intestinal mucosal barrier can block the bacteria of the lumen, but LPS can penetrate this barrier into the blood, putting the body in a state of chronic low-grade inflammation and reducing the body’s immune function. However, after long-term exposure to high doses of LPS, a large number of lysosomes in goblet cells caused loss of function, and mucus layer thickness was significantly decreased. A large amount of LPS stuck to the mucus, leading to normal LPS and inflammatory cytokines level of plasma. The intestinal tissue morphology was damaged, and a number of immune cells were necrosis in the intestine. Collectively, long-term exposure to low doses of LPS lead to chronic low-grade inflammation in the body. Long-term exposure to high doses of LPS can be directly linked to the severity of the immunosuppression in the body.

Subject Areas

lipopolysaccharides; mucin; ileum; MUC2; mucosal barrier; mouse

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