Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Relationship between Regular Sinusoidal Waves in the Tissue at Lung-related Acupuncture Points and the Respiration Pacesetter Mechanism

Version 1 : Received: 16 October 2019 / Approved: 17 October 2019 / Online: 17 October 2019 (12:54:15 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 24 October 2019 / Approved: 25 October 2019 / Online: 25 October 2019 (11:32:14 CEST)

How to cite: Kovich, F. The Relationship between Regular Sinusoidal Waves in the Tissue at Lung-related Acupuncture Points and the Respiration Pacesetter Mechanism. Preprints 2019, 2019100201 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201910.0201.v1). Kovich, F. The Relationship between Regular Sinusoidal Waves in the Tissue at Lung-related Acupuncture Points and the Respiration Pacesetter Mechanism. Preprints 2019, 2019100201 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201910.0201.v1).

Abstract

Background: While investigating the real-time impedance at acupuncture points (acupoints), it was found that regular sinusoidal waves were present that corresponded to the pulsing of certain organs, such as respiration and duodenal waves, the stomach’s slow waves, and also the heart’s beating.Methods: This study investigated such respiration waves at lung-related acupoints to clarify their relation to the respiration pacesetter mechanism. The impedance at key acupoints was monitored in real time while the patients’ breathing slowed after exercise.Results: In all 7 patients studied, the respiration and heart-beat waves matched the rates in the corresponding organs at rest, and did not vary markedly due to exercise. In 3 of the 7 patients, their post-exercise respiration rate exactly matched that of their duodenal waves, but then dropped, stepwise, back to their usual respiration rate. In the other 4 patients, their post-exercise respiration rate did not reach that of their duodenal waves, so this pattern was not triggered.Conclusion: The results suggested that as well as the brainstem respiration pacesetter, there was also a separate “pace signal” present which remained constant and seemed to define the respiration rate when at rest. It is currently unknown what mechanism causes the respiration rate to increase due to exercise. But these results suggest that the brainstem pacesetter is sometimes guided by the duodenal pace signal instead of the lung pace signal, which may explain how the pacesetter is able to jump to a higher rate, even though its chemoreceptor inputs may be unchanged.

Supplementary and Associated Material

Subject Areas

acupuncture; duodenum; impedance; lungs; respiration pacesetter;

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