Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Simulating Flash Floods Using a Geostationary Satellite-Based Rainfall Estimation Coupled with a Land Surface Model

Version 1 : Received: 26 September 2019 / Approved: 27 September 2019 / Online: 27 September 2019 (10:42:41 CEST)

How to cite: Suseno, D.P.Y.; Yamada, T.J. Simulating Flash Floods Using a Geostationary Satellite-Based Rainfall Estimation Coupled with a Land Surface Model. Preprints 2019, 2019090312 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201909.0312.v1). Suseno, D.P.Y.; Yamada, T.J. Simulating Flash Floods Using a Geostationary Satellite-Based Rainfall Estimation Coupled with a Land Surface Model. Preprints 2019, 2019090312 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201909.0312.v1).

Abstract

Clarifying hydrologic behavior, especially behavior related to extreme events such as flash floods, is vital for flood mitigation and management. However, discharge and rainfall measurement data are scarce, which is a major obstacle to flood mitigation. This study (i) simulated flash floods on a regional scale using three types of rainfall forcing implemented in a land surface model and (ii) evaluated and compared simulated flash floods with the observed discharge. The three types of rainfall forcing were those observed by the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS) (Simulation I), the observed rainfall from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation (MLIT) (Simulation II), and the estimated rainfall from the Multi-purpose Transport Satellite (MTSAT), which was downscaled by AMeDAS rainfall (Simulation III). MLIT rainfall observations have a denser station network over the Ishikari River basin (spacing of approximately 10 km) compared with AMeDAS (spacing of approximately 20 km), so they are expected to capture the rainfall spatial distribution more accurately. A land surface model, Minimal Advance Treatments of Surface Interaction and Runoff (MATSIRO), was implemented for the flash flood simulation. The river flow simulations were run over the Ishikari river basin at a 1-km grid resolution and a 1-h temporal resolution during August 2010. The statistical performance of the river flow simulations demonstrated that Simulation I was reasonable compared with Simulation III. The findings also suggest that the advantage of the MTSAT-based estimated rainfall (i.e., good spatial distribution) can be coupled with the benefit of direct AMeDAS observations (i.e., representation of the true rainfall).

Subject Areas

mtsat; lsm; heavy rainfall; flash flood

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