Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Elucidating Biological Roles of Novel Murine Genes in Hearing Impairment in Africa

Version 1 : Received: 18 September 2019 / Approved: 19 September 2019 / Online: 19 September 2019 (11:27:27 CEST)

How to cite: Oluwole, O.; Yalcouye, A.; Wonkam, E.; Manyisa, N.; Morrice, J.; Mazanda, G.; Wonkam, A. Elucidating Biological Roles of Novel Murine Genes in Hearing Impairment in Africa. Preprints 2019, 2019090222 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201909.0222.v1). Oluwole, O.; Yalcouye, A.; Wonkam, E.; Manyisa, N.; Morrice, J.; Mazanda, G.; Wonkam, A. Elucidating Biological Roles of Novel Murine Genes in Hearing Impairment in Africa. Preprints 2019, 2019090222 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201909.0222.v1).

Abstract

The prevalence of congenital hearing impairment (HI) is highest in Africa. Estimates evaluated genetic causes to account for 31% of HI cases in Africa, but the identification of associated causative genes mutations have been challenging. In this study, we reviewed the potential roles, in humans, of 38 novel genes identified in a murine study. We gathered information from various genomic annotation databases and performed functional enrichment analysis using online resources i.e. genemania and g.proflier. Results revealed that 27/38 genes are express mostly in the brain, suggesting additional cognitive roles. Indeed, HERC1- R3250X had been associated with intellectual disability in a Moroccan family. A homozygous 216-bp deletion in KLC2 was found in two siblings of Egyptian descent with spastic paraplegia. Up to 27/38 murine genes have link to at least a disease, and the commonest mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive (n=8). Network analysis indicates that 20 other genes have intermediate and biological links to the novel genes, suggesting their possible roles in HI. This study will contribute to advance our knowledge in unravelling the biological roles of novel murine HI genes in humans and could enhance the understanding of the genetic causes of HI in Africans.

Subject Areas

hearing impairment; novel murine genes; gene enrichment; africa

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